December 20, 2014

Using Sources: Creating a Digital Annotated Bibliography

Sample annotated bibliography

Cornell University Library describes an annotated bibliography as "a list of citations to books, articles, and documents. Each citation is followed by a brief (usually about 150 words) descriptive and evaluative paragraph, the annotation."Lisa Oppenheim from the Chicago Metro History Education Center notes that annotations for National History Day (NHD) and Chicago Metro History Fair should be around 50 words and not much longer than 75 words. Annotated bibliographies serve one or more of the … [Read more...]

Tech Tools: Citation Tools

Citation needed

There are many digital citation tools available to help students properly cite the sources used in research projects. Below is a brief overview of five free resources. EasyBib Pros: numerous source types; auto search and annotation options; free Android and iOS apps and a Google Docs Add-on Cons: multiple advertisements; does not offer Turabian style Styles: MLA, APA, Chicago, Chicago Author-Date, AMA, ASA, ACS, CSE, Harvard 1 Source types: nearly 60 options, 22 of which can be … [Read more...]

Using Sources: Citing Digitized Sources from the Library

Citing Cartoons - Chicago Style

The Library of Congress offers more than 20 million digitized primary sources available to researchers of all ages. When using these sources in learning projects, it is important to provide citations of the primary sources. Citing primary sources requires students to think carefully about the source—who created/published/distributed it, when was it created, and from where was it accessed. Citing sources ensures that full credit is given to the creators and publishers of sources and that others … [Read more...]

Finding Resources: Ask Us, Ask a Librarian!

Ask a Librarian

If you've browsed and searched the TPS-Barat Primary Source Nexus and still can't find what you were looking for, feel free to contact us with questions about Library resources or strategies for teaching with primary sources. We also welcome you to leave a comment on any post. You can get help directly from the Library of Congress too. The Ask a Librarian resource provides several different avenues to get your questions answered. There are links to email forms for a variety of Library … [Read more...]

Finding Resources: Browsing & Searching the Primary Source Nexus

findonpg

Browsing TPS-Barat Resources The TPS-Barat Resources section on the top menu provides access to themed link sets—groups of primary sources, teaching resources and other online Library content—resources aligned to the Chicago Public Schools social science framework and the categories and subcategories of all posts on the TPS-Barat Primary Source Nexus. Click the links to learn more. Themed Link Sets Culture African American resources Asian Pacific American resources Hispanic … [Read more...]

Tech Tool: Digital Primary Source Analysis Tool

Digital Primary Source Analysis Tool

The Library of Congress digital primary source analysis tool is an especially great resource when you want to model a primary source analysis or when you want to complete a class or collaborative primary source analysis. The tool can be used with numerous types of primary source analyses and features prompts for the Observe, Reflect and Question columns as well as the Further Investigation box; the precise number of prompts for each is dependent on the primary source format … [Read more...]

Tech Tool: Interactive Thinking Triangle

TPS-Barat-Interactive-Thinking-Triangle

We have had lots of teachers use the primary source thinking triangle with great success, so when Montana teacher librarian Ruth Ferris asked if we had an interactive version of this graphic organizer we knew it was time to create one. While it's not high-tech, Ferris said it will help her model the process of completing the the thinking triangle. We have created versions in Google Docs and Microsoft PowerPoint®. If you haven't yet used the primary source thinking triangle, learn how to use … [Read more...]

Finding Resources: America’s Library

America's Library homepage

America's Library is filled with stories about the history and culture of the United States, richly embellished with all types of primary sources. The website is a great way to introduce younger students and lower level readers to the Library of Congress and primary sources. You can access America's Library by clicking the Kids & Families link, found in the main, center section—Collection Highlights—of the Library website homepage under the Especially for header. On the Kids … [Read more...]

Using Sources: Viewing, Saving & Printing Maps

maps5

Overview The Library of Congress cartographic collection is the largest in the world and contains millions of maps, thousands of which are available online from the LOC.gov website. The Library interface allows you to zoom into these digitized maps in incredible detail simply through your web browser, save the maps in a variety of sizes for offline viewing, and even print the maps out. Viewing maps online Click on an item from a search result to view the map's bibliographic record and a … [Read more...]

Finding Resources: What’s Available When LOC.gov Is Offline

Internet-Archive-Wayback-Machine

Sometimes LOC.gov and some of its associated sites are not available. Whether that's because of maintenance or a government shutdown, don't despair. Here are some ways to access great Library resources. Congress.gov legislative information on Congress.gov available World Digital Library primary sources from numerous partner institutions, including the Library of Congress, available Library of Congress Flickr account image sets available, including access to larger images and … [Read more...]