December 2, 2020

Guided Primary Source Analysis: Pulling Down the Statue

Take a close look at this image to notice small details as well as the bigger picture. Then fill out an Event Happenings worksheet. Next, review the complete work and the source record. What more did you learn? Now look closely at two more images of the same event; the first is a modified image of the first and the second is an entirely different image. Be sure to look closely. What do you learn from the images and source records? Compare and contrast the images as well as the information you … [Read more...]

Citizen U Bulletin: Volume 1, Issue 10

Bulletin   Volume 1, Issue 10 CIVICS IN ACTION Citizen U Weaving civics across grades and disciplines Click the links to access, use and rate Featured Lessons: Political Parties The Formation of Political Parties In this lesson from the Democracy Project, students work in groups to investigate a case study … [Read more...]

Timely Connections: Frederick Douglass & the Emancipation Memorial

Amid calls for removal of the Emancipation Memorial, also called the Freedmen’s Monument, in Washington D.C. and a replica of it in Boston, Washington Post reporter DaNeen L. Brown considers the statue and takes a look back at a speech made by Frederick Douglass at the D.C. unveiling ceremony on April 14, 1876. In the speech, Douglass recognizes the dichotomy of Lincoln's views on slavery while ultimately celebrating the proclamation. If Harriet Hosmer's design for the memorial—four … [Read more...]

C.A.R.E. Listening & Learning for Educators

In times of darkness, teachers always rise up. But now, this time comes on top of a pandemic and as teachers are exhausted and empty. The topics are big – social justice, institutional racism, and nonviolent and violent protest. The events of the past days have made these issues impossible to ignore, in much the same way that the limits of online learning have thrust systemic educational inequity to the forefront. Now more the ever, teachers again are called to be the ones who can transform … [Read more...]

Citizen U Bulletin: Volume 1, Issue 9

Bulletin   Volume 1, Issue 9 CIVICS IN ACTION Citizen U Weaving civics across grades and disciplines Click the links to access, use and rate Featured Lessons: Youth in Action Kids, Collaboration, and Coalitions Students explore coalition-building accomplishments of young people … [Read more...]

Timely Connections: Frederick Douglass & Scientific Racism

In an opinion piece for the New York Times, Eric Herschthal, a fellow at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at the New York Public Library, suggests that we remember Frederick Douglass "as someone whose insights about scientific theories of race are every bit as relevant in our era as they were when he wrote them." Take a look at the examples Herschthal provides about Douglass'  efforts to challenge scientific racism, including ethnology or, as it was sometimes referred to, "the … [Read more...]

Timely Connections: James Madison & Slavery

In an opinion piece for the New York Times, Noah Feldman, a Harvard law professor and the author of the book The Three Lives of James Madison: Genius, Partisan, President, discusses the dichotomies between Madison's moral views of slavery and his actions. Delving into the past, he contends, can provide us with lessons in racism for today. The tension between Madison’s aspirational beliefs and his highly constrained actions continues to be America’s own tension. Like Madison, contemporary United … [Read more...]

NHD 2016: CMHEC Topic Ideas – Civil Rights

Below you will find Library of Congress resources curated by TPS-Barat that relate to National History Day 2016 topic ideas from the Chicago Metro History Education Center. This set specifically focuses on civil rights but all topic ideas are related to the 2016 NHD theme: Exploration, Encounter, Exchange in History. More CMHEC topics will be referenced in subsequent posts. American Indians in Chicago during Progressive Era American Indians Chicago: historic newspaper articles … [Read more...]

Today in History: Billie Holiday

Today in History–April 7–the Library of Congress features jazz singer Billie Holiday, born on this date in 1915 in Baltimore, Maryland. Although she had no formal music training, Holiday arranged and composed music in addition to singing. Her 1939 rendition of Lewis Allan's "Strange Fruit," a song about lynching, was described in the liner notes to Immortal Sessions of Billie Holiday as "…the most anguished and harrowing expression of protest against man's inhumanity to man that has ever been … [Read more...]