November 22, 2019

Guided Primary Source Analysis: Bonus Veterans

Carefully study the details of the Bonus Veterans photograph above. Brainstorm a list of questions you would need answered in order to write an article about this image. Share your questions with an elbow partner, then investigate this primary source image set to see what questions you were able to answer. Write a brief summary of what you learned. Work in groups to review the Washington, D.C. Evening Star coverage of the "Bonus Army" (see links below). Read the headlines and first couple of … [Read more...]

Integrating Tech: Post-It App & Primary Source Analysis

In a TPS Network resource album available to the public, elementary teacher librarian and former teacher in residence at the Library of Congress, Tom Bober (@CaptainLibrary), outlines how his students analyzed an historical newspaper article using the See Think Wonder strategy that layered in the Post-it® app for iPad to help organize students' thinking. The analysis activity was followed up by a reading of A Lady Has the Floor: Belva Lockwood Speaks Out for Women's Rights. Resources … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Addressing the Gettysburg Address

This lesson may be completed in whole or in part, depending on the needs of your students and the time that you have. FOCUS QUESTION In what ways is equality a proposition, or belief, worth fighting for? LESSON OVERVIEW Students will consider whether equality is important to our democracy as they develop a deep understanding of the literary and historical value of the Gettysburg Address through a game-based close reading of the text. LESSON OBJECTIVES Analyze primary sources … [Read more...]

Integrating Technology: Making Myriopticons

OK, so this post isn't about digital technology but it does present an idea for combining history with a maker lab of sorts that incorporates math, engineering and art. Let's take a look at a blog post from In Custodia Legis, which features, “A Historical Panorama of the Rebellion” myriopticon, a toy manufactured by Milton Bradley around 1865. "The myriopticon was an educational device targeted at prepubescent boys that consists of a box containing a painted scroll and two scroll tubes. A key … [Read more...]

Timely Connections: Fake News & Civic Reasoning

Practicing primary source analysis helps students develop historical thinking skills that also happen to be very important civic literacy skills. In an article from the Fall 2017 issue of American Educator, Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) provides assessments of online civic reasoning and tips for going beyond identifying news as "fake" or "real" to understanding where information comes from and who is behind it. Social studies consultant and History Tech blogger Glenn Wiebe provides … [Read more...]

Integrating Tech: Let’s Recap & Primary Source Analysis

This is a guest post from veteran teacher Heather Klos, an 8th grade U.S. history teacher and the Social Studies department chair at Crownover Middle School in Corinth, Texas. Primary sources are one of the most valuable tools we have as social studies teachers.  What better way to incorporate primary sources for the 21st century learner than through the use of technology.  This year I discovered Recap and realized quickly that this could be a powerful tool in the analysis process for my … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Geography & the Civil War

This is a guest post from Nicole Woulfe, a middle school social studies teacher from New Hampshire and a Citizen U pilot lesson implementer. Learn more about the creation, implementation and reflection of this lesson. Focus Question What role did geography play in the turning points of Vicksburg and Sherman’s March during the Civil War? Content goal Geography Grade 6 Competency: Students will demonstrate and apply knowledge of geography and geographic tools in the study of the … [Read more...]

Tech Tool: Creating a Google Form Zoom-in Activity

This is a guest post from Sara Conyers, a middle school history teacher at Longfellow Middle School in Falls Church, Virginia. Creating a Zoom-in primary source analysis activity using Google Forms is quick and easy. Step 1 – Select Image Select a primary source image that will challenge your students to dig deeper into the meaning and message of the creator. Images can be photographs, fine art, political cartoons, sheet music, printed ephemera and more.   Step 2 – Create … [Read more...]

Teaching Now: Zooming In on the Benefits of Primary Source Analysis Using Google Forms

This is a guest post from Alissa Oginsky, a museum educator and 6th-grade history teacher at Holmes Middle School in Alexandria, Virginia. Teachers are always on the hunt for new and exciting ways for students to exercise their critical and creative thinking skills. The journey, in fact, never seems to stop! Like many history teachers who have projected, printed, hidden parts of, and even cut up primary source images, I have seen the incredible power primary sources offer by giving students … [Read more...]

Integrating Tech: Zoom-in to Primary Source Analysis

This is a guest post from Patti Winch, the Middle School Social Studies Specialist for Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS) in Virginia. I first learned about Zoom-ins about 10 years ago when taking a class with Northern Virginia’s Teaching with Primary Sources program or TPSNVA.  Zoom-ins were originally developed by a FCPS teacher and subsequently shared via the TPSNVA platform.  The strategy is also highlighted in Making Thinking Visible by Ron Ritchart, Mark Church, and Karin Morrison … [Read more...]