February 18, 2019

Today in History: Woman’s Rights Conventions

Today in History–May 28–the Library of Congress features the Woman's Rights Convention, held in Akron, Ohio on this date and May 29 in 1851. Convention topics included common law, education and labor, including wage inequities. Find out more about the early efforts of women's rights advocates by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access primary sources related to the 1851 convention and those that preceded and followed. The proceedings of the Woman's Rights … [Read more...]

State Spotlight: Ohio

Ohio stories from America's Library Ohio primary source set Ohio maps Ohio images from American Memory More Ohio images Ohio films Ohio books & articles Ohio reports, correspondence & other texts Ohio historical newspaper collection Ohio sheet music Ohio songs & oral histories (audio recordings) Ohio legislation Ohio Guide to Law Online First American West: The Ohio River Valley, 1750-1820 The African-American Experience in Ohio Captain … [Read more...]

Today in History: Siege of Fort Meigs

Today in History–May 9–the Library of Congress features the siege of Fort Meigs by Shawnee military leader Tecumseh and British general Henry A. Proctor on this day in 1813.  But the invaders were unsuccessful as General William Henry Harrison held onto the fort that he had ordered built on the Maumee River above Toledo, Ohio. Learn more by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access primary sources related to Fort Meigs, William H. Harrison, and Tecumseh by … [Read more...]

Today in History: Erie Canal

Today in History–October 26–the Library of Congress features the Erie Canal, which opened on this day in 1825. Harnessing gravity, the 363-mile waterway flowed from Buffalo, New York on the east coast of Lake Erie to the upper Hudson River at Albany. Decried by many as "Clinton's Folly", New York Governor  DeWitt Clinton, the canal proved to be tremendously successful and encouraged settlement of the upper Midwest. Find out more about the Erie Canal by visiting the Today in History section, then … [Read more...]

Featured Source: C&O Canal, Georgetown D.C.

What feeling do you get from looking at this painting? What details or techniques do you think are responsible for that feeling? What does the artwork seem to suggest about the C&O Canal? Use details from the painting to support your conclusion. Compare and contrast this painting with photographs of the C&O canal. What similarities do you notice? What differences do you see? What other observations, reflections or questions does this source inspire? Let us know! … [Read more...]

Today in History: C&O Canal

Today in History–October 10–the Library of Congress features Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, which opened on this day in 1850. The 184.5-mile C&O canal connected Washington, D.C., to Cumberland, Maryland and took 22 years to complete (ground was broken on the same day as the B&O Railroad). Find out more about the history of early river transportation by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access more primary sources related to the C&O Canal. C&O … [Read more...]

Primary Source Learning: Native American Indian Perspectives

In celebration of Native American Heritage month, the Teaching with the Library of Congress blog provides some great suggestions for teaching students to view the experiences and contributions of Native American Indians from various perspectives. Links to more Native American teaching resources are listed below and you'll find even more primary source resources from around the Library via the PSN curated Native American Heritage themed link set. Lesson Plans & Activity Ideas Learning … [Read more...]

Today in History: Cleveland, Ohio

Today in History–July 22–the Library of Congress features Cleveland, Ohio. When General Moses Cleaveland and a party of surveyors arrived at the mouth of the Cuyahoga River on July 22, 1796, they thought it would make an ideal location for a new town. The city became officially known as Cleveland when the Cleveland Advertiser dropped the first "a" in the city's name to reduce the length of the newspaper's masthead. Learn more about this city on Lake Erie by visiting the Today in History section, … [Read more...]