July 14, 2020

Guided Primary Source Analysis: Pulling Down the Statue

Take a close look at this image to notice small details as well as the bigger picture. Then fill out an Event Happenings worksheet. Then look at the full picture and the source record. What do you learn from it? Now look closely at two more images of the same event; the first is a modified image of the first and the second is an entirely different image. What do you learn from the images and source records? Compare and contrast the images as well as the information you learned from the source … [Read more...]

Timely Connections: Worldwide Health Crisis

As the world confronts global health problems such as epidemics or pandemics, involve your students in an authentic lesson that looks at past primary sources to increase understanding of health related issues. Encourage students to use past and current information and digital tools to research, make informed decisions and contribute to their own and their community’s health information. This lesson idea, which  also includes guiding questions, a curated set of historical primary sources, … [Read more...]

Guided Primary Source Analysis: First Post-War Legislature

Use the Library of Congress primary source analysis tool to analyze the image. What do you notice? What do you find surprising? What can you learn from the bibliographic record? Why do you suppose the men in the image were referred to as radical members? What questions do you have? Next, analyze the two sources below to learn what this legislature accomplished and what resistance there was to their work. Summarize what you learned and how your new understandings inform your analysis of the … [Read more...]

Guided Primary Source Analysis: Bonus Veterans

Carefully study the details of the Bonus Veterans photograph above. Brainstorm a list of questions you would need answered in order to write an article about this image. Share your questions with an elbow partner, then investigate this primary source image set to see what questions you were able to answer. Write a brief summary of what you learned. Work in groups to review the Washington, D.C. Evening Star coverage of the "Bonus Army" (see links below). Read the headlines and first couple of … [Read more...]

Guided Primary Source Analysis: Shrinking Glaciers

Zoom into the map and analyze it, creating a bulleted list of what you learned from your analysis and another list of any questions that you have; click the image above to access the source record. Use the scale to trace a 1-mile square grid over the image portion of the map. Use the grid to determine a rough estimate of the number of square miles of glacier coverage, jotting down the number. Then create a square-mile grid for this timelapse map to determine rough estimates of the number of … [Read more...]

Citizen U Webinar: The “Four Freedoms” & the Bill of Rights

Citizen U lessons infuse civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions across the core subjects in elementary, middle, and high school grades. This interactive webinar will feature practice with interdisciplinary civics, inquiry-based learning, and teaching with primary sources. You'll see how these free lessons can be used in either ELA or social studies classes and how they're differentiated across grade spans from elementary to high school. You’ll also be eligible to enter a drawing for a $50 … [Read more...]

Citizen U Webinar: Teaching About Dolores Huerta & the United Farm Workers

Citizen U lessons infuse civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions across the core subjects in elementary, middle, and high school grades. This interactive webinar featured practice with interdisciplinary civics, inquiry-based learning, and teaching with primary sources, and information about three ELA-Civics lessons about Dolores Huerta and the United Farm Workers. The lessons reach across grade levels to elementary, middle and high school students. View webinar recording. Related … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: The Declaration, Her Declaration, Your Declaration

Discuss the Declaration of Independence. Why was it written? What meaning did it have in 1776? What meaning does it have today? Read the Declaration of Independence and highlight words and phrases that stand out to you. Read over the words and phrases you highlighted. In what ways does the language you selected help to clarify or distill the meaning of the Declaration of Independence for you? Read over the words and phrases you highlighted again. In what other context of your life might … [Read more...]

Guided Primary Source Analysis: Woman’s Work

Look carefully at the photograph above and respond to the following questions. What do you notice first? What else do you see? What details can you point to? What might those details tell you about this woman and what she is doing? What might those details tell you about why this photo was taken, or the purpose it might have served? What questions do you have? Now review the bibliographic record for this image, then this set of related images. Were any of your previous … [Read more...]

Timely Connections: James Madison & Slavery

In an opinion piece for the New York Times, Noah Feldman, a Harvard law professor and the author of the book The Three Lives of James Madison: Genius, Partisan, President, discusses the dichotomies between Madison's moral views of slavery and his actions. Delving into the past, he contends, can provide us with lessons in racism for today. The tension between Madison’s aspirational beliefs and his highly constrained actions continues to be America’s own tension. Like Madison, contemporary United … [Read more...]