September 15, 2021

Collections Spotlight: Disability Resources

U.S. legislation Disability pride Disability Disability Law in the United States: A Beginner's Guide Global Legal Monitor articles: disability Historical newspaper coverage: disability Disability books, reports & other texts Disability image set Blind persons image set Disability film and event video recordings Disability History Primary Source Set Emerging America More disability history resources from Emerging America Disabled Veterans: The Unhealed … [Read more...]

Collections Spotlight: LGBTQ+ Resources

LGBTQ Activism and Contributions primary source set with teacher's guide Photographs Gay men creating a display labeled "Free: Gay Liberation, Minnesota" 1970 Male couples 1970 Gay rights demonstration at the Democratic National Convention 1976 AIDS quilt, Washington, D.C. 1987 Gary Pride Parade image set 2012 An LGBT Pride flag 2018 Posters Gay is angry, gay revolution networker 1971 I never loved a man the way that I love you! 1973 Gays & work symposium … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Covid-19 Coronavirus Pandemic

In the midst of the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, the Library of Congress is collecting images, maps, web content and many more primary sources in order to, in the words of collection development officer Joe Puccio, "acquire and what a researcher in a hundred years will need to see from what is being produced today." Learn more about the Library's collection efforts by reading the following Library of Congress Blog post: How Will We Remember COVID-19? Then click the links below to review … [Read more...]

Analyzing Primary Sources: Tools & Guides

Primary sources, as described by the Library of Congress, "are the raw materials of history — original documents and objects that were created at the time under study. They are different from secondary sources, accounts that retell, analyze, or interpret events, usually at a distance of time or place. Bringing young people into close contact with these unique, often profoundly personal documents and objects can give them a sense of what it was like to be alive during a long-past era. Helping … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Louise Glück

Louise Glück is an award-winning American poet—2020 Nobel Prize for Literature, the 2014 National Book Award, 1993 Pulitzer Prize, and 1992 Bobbitt Prize, among others—who also served as a Special Bicentennial Consultant from 1999-2000 and the U.S. Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry from 2003-2004 at the Library of Congress. Event video recordings Louise Glück Reads Her Poetry Jan. 29, 1988 (1:05:08) Bicentennial Symposium: Poetry & the American People Apr. 4, 2000 … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Film & Video

Film & video collections America at Work, America at Leisure: Motion Pictures 1894-1915 American Archive of Public Broadcasting 1960 on American Variety Stage: Vaudeville and Popular Entertainment 1870-1920 Before and After the Great Earthquake and Fire: Early Films of San Francisco 1897-1916 Buckaroos in Paradise: Ranching Culture in Northern Nevada 1945-1982 The Carnegie Hall Collection of Conversations with Composers Chicago Ethnic Arts Project Collection Civil … [Read more...]

Today in History: NASA & the Space Age

Today in History–June 24–the Library of Congress features the dawn of the space age. On this date in 1961, the public learned of President John F. Kennedy's letter assigning Vice President Lyndon Johnson to coordinate the U.S. satellite programs. Under Johnson, the National Space Council recommended that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide policy coordination with all government agencies involved in space flight. Find out more about the U.S. quest to explore the … [Read more...]

Today in History: Duke Ellington

Today in History–April 29–the Library of Congress features jazz great Duke Ellington, born on this date in 1899. Ellington started to play piano at age 7 and wrote his first song–Soda Fountain Rag–at age 15. By his late teens, he was earning enough money to help his parents move into a better house. Ellington's musical versatility was astounding and not limited to jazz; he also wrote oratorios, suites, concertos, and even opera, as well as for the Broadway stage, movies, television, nightclubs, … [Read more...]

Today in History: The Star Spangled Banner

Today in History–September 13–the Library of Congress features our national anthem, the Star Spangled Banner. On September 13, 1814 a lawyer named Francis Scott Key witnessed the British bombing Fort McHenry from Baltimore harbor and decided to write a song to commemorate what he saw. Uncover more of the story by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access learning activities and more primary sources. Teaching resources Learning from the Source: The Star … [Read more...]