October 27, 2021

Timely Connections: The Tulsa Race Massacre Then and Now

The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, or the Attack on Greenwood, was, and remains, one of the bloodiest outbreaks of racist violence in U.S. history. The incident began with the arrest of a young black man on May 31, was incited by an inflammatory report in the May 31 edition of the Tulsa Tribune, and ended around 24 hours later after white rioters looted and burned the prosperous black community on June 1. In the aftermath, dozens of city blocks were razed, hundreds killed, and thousands left … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Race Riots/Protests

Wilmington, North Carolina 1898 1898 newspaper coverage Early African American Perspectives on the Wilmington Race Riots Documenting the American South 1898 Monument and Memorial Park Documenting the American South New York City 1900 August, 1900: select newspaper articles more 1900 newspaper coverage Atlanta, Georgia 1906 1906 newspaper coverage E. W. Evans oral history transcript Atlanta riot recollections Letter from Francis Jackson Garrison to Booker T. … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Black Women’s Clubs

In the late nineteenth century black women organized to bolster their communities by undertaking educational, philanthropic and welfare activities.¹ National Association of Colored Women reports, articles & other texts National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs historical newspaper coverage National Association of Colored Women's Clubs website Negro Women’s Clubs historical newspaper coverage African-American women’s clubs in Chicago 1890-1920 Illinois Periodicals … [Read more...]

Collection Spotlight: Civil Rights History Project

The Civil Rights History Project collection is a direct result of the 2009 Civil Rights History Project Act. This law mandated the Library of Congress and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) to conduct a survey of existing civil rights oral-history collections and enhance these collections by recording new interviews with people who contributed to the movement. This collection features new oral histories focused on the recollections of previously … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Zooming into Documentary Photography

Zoom into the picture above and you will see a face recognizable to many. The mother in the photo is Florence Thompson, most famously known as the migrant mother. This photograph was one in a series taken in 1936 by Resettlement Administration photographer Dorothea Lange. In this primary source activity, students will examine photographs individually and as a set. They will then analyze a variety of primary sources and texts to use as evidence in an essay that defines documentary photography, … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Indian Territory Resettlement

In his article, "Thinking Like an Historian", from the TPS Quarterly archive (now the TPS Journal), Sam Wineburg points out how many students' view of history—memorization—diverges from that of historians—investigation—and offers advice for using primary sources to engage students in the "historical approach". Doing so will help students make more authentic and lasting connections to important historical themes and events as well as give them practice in key Common Core State Standards in … [Read more...]

Today in History: Oklahoma

Today in History–November 16–the Library of Congress features Oklahoma, which became the 46th state on this day in 1907. Find out more about the history and culture of the Sooner state by visiting the Today in History section, then follow the links below to access prime primary sources. Oklahoma stories from America’s Library Oklahoma primary source set with Teacher’s Guide Oklahoma historical newspapers Oklahoma maps Oklahoma books & articles Oklahoma reports, fieldnotes … [Read more...]