June 15, 2021

Today in History: June Posts

June 1 June 2 1899: New York City's Finest 1921: Tulsa Race Massacre 1866: Grover Cleveland 1924: Indian Citizenship Act June 3 June 4 1864: Battle of Cold Harbor 1880: Bell's Photophone 1754: Fort Necessity & the French and Indian War 1919 Congress Approves 19th Amendment 1968: The Gish Sisters June 5 June 6 1851: Uncle Tom's Cabin 1756: John Trumbull 1944: D-Day June 7 June … [Read more...]

Today in History: Belva Lockwood

Today in History—November 30—the In Custodia Legis blog features lawyer Belva Lockwood, the became the first woman to argue before the U.S. Supreme Court on this day in 1880. In that case—Kaiser v. Stickney—she represented a local property owner in a debt dispute. Although Lockwood lost this case, she returned to the Supreme Court in 1906, at the age of 76, representing the Eastern and Emigrant Cherokees in the United States v. Cherokee Nation. This time her arguments prevailed and the Court … [Read more...]

Today in History: March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Today in History–August 28–the Library of Congress features the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, held on this day in 1963. Around a quarter million people participated in this non-violent demonstration for civil rights seeking, among other things, equal access to public accommodations, decent housing, adequate and integrated education, the right to vote, and job training. The six primary organizers and organizations for the March were: James Farmer, National Director of the Congress of … [Read more...]

Today in History: Plymouth Colony

Today in History–October 4–the Library of Congress features Plymouth Colony. On October 4, 1636, the General Court of Plymouth Colony instituted a legal code that guaranteed citizens a trial by jury and laws made with the consent of freemen. Discover more by reviewing the Today in History section, then click the links below to access stories and primary sources. The Treaty That Saved Plymouth Colony The Murder of Penowanyanquis and the Trial of Arthur Peach, Plymouth, 1638 Plymouth … [Read more...]

Today In History: Toni Morrison

Today in History–August 5–the Primary Source Nexus features Toni Morrison, who died at the age of 88 on this date in 2019. Her novel Beloved won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1988 and Morrison was awarded the 1993 Nobel Prize in literature for “novels characterized by visionary force and poetic import, [giving] life to an essential aspect of American reality.” In 2000, the Library of Congress named her a Living Legend; in 2011, it awarded her the Library of Congress National Book Festival … [Read more...]

Today in History: Jefferson Davis Captured

Today in History–May 10–the Library of Congress features the capture of Confederate President Jefferson Davis by Union troops on this day in 1865. The capture thwarted Davis’ plan to escape by sea from the east coast of Florida and then to sail to Texas where he hoped to establish a new Confederacy. He was sent, along with his family, to Fort Monroe in Virginia. There he was placed in solitary confinement and indicted for treason but was never tried. Davis was released two years later, in May … [Read more...]

Today in History: County and State Fairs

Today in History–August 22–the Library of Congress features county and state fairs, many of which are held around this date. County and state fairs feature entertainment as well as showcase the agricultural industry and rural lifestyles. Learn more by reviewing the Today in History section, then click the links below to access primary sources & more. County and State Fairs from America's Library County fair images A rube couple at a county fair 1904 film County fair audio … [Read more...]

Today in History: Juneteenth

Today in History–June 19–TPS-Barat features Juneteenth. On this date in 1865, Major General Gordon Granger issued General Order No. 3 in Galveston, Texas, informing the slaves of the Emancipation Proclamation, issued two and a half years earlier by President Abraham Lincoln. Although Juneteenth was informally celebrated each year since 1865, it wasn't until June 3, 1979, that Texas became the first state to proclaim it an official state holiday. Today more than 40 officially recognize … [Read more...]

Today in History: Clara Barton & the Red Cross

Today in History–May 21–TPS-Barat features Clarissa "Clara" Barton, who founded the Red Cross on this date in 1881. A former teacher, Barton was working in the U.S. patent office at the start of the Civil War. Despite having little nursing training, Barton administered aid to soldiers at several battlefields. After the war she established the Missing Soldier Office in Washington, D.C., led the effort to establish a national cemetery at Andersonville Prison, and, in 1881, founded the American Red … [Read more...]

Today in History: Join or Die

Today in History–May 9–the Library of Congress features the first political cartoon published in the United States  on this day in 1754. The "Join or Die" cartoon, purportedly devised by Benjamin Franklin, provided commentary on the need for the colonies to join together against French and Native American aggression along the western frontier. Learn more by visiting the Today in History section and clicking the resources below. Join or Die political cartoon woodcut Masthead and part of … [Read more...]