May 27, 2018

Primary Source Learning: Poets & Poetry

Featured Source guided primary source analysis activities The Banks of the Yellow River Dedication by Robert Frost Official Program Woman Suffrage Procession The Poem Woman and Child Found Poetry activities Found poetry primary source set Found poetry primary source activities Learning from the Source lessons Ballad of Booker T. The Declaration, Her Declaration, Your Declaration The Negro Speaks of Rivers Putting Loss into Words Mourning Lincoln … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Mourning Lincoln & the Art of Tribute

From the Library of Congress bicentennial exhibition—With Malice Toward None—we learn a bit about the profound effect Abraham Lincoln's death had on people all over the world. The assassination of President Abraham Lincoln on Good Friday, April 14, 1865, had a tremendous impact both in the United States and abroad. People in Great Britain, which had favored the South, mourned as if Lincoln had been their leader. France, whose citizens had made no secret of their sympathy for the Union, paid … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Putting Loss into Words

During the civil war Walt Whitman worked in Washington D.C. and spent much of his spare time visiting wounded soldiers in the hospital. He was a great admirer of Abraham Lincoln whom he saw around the city frequently. Like many, Whitman was deeply saddened at the loss of  President Lincoln, assassinated at Ford's Theatre on April 14, 1865. Whitman wrote several poems about Lincoln after his death. Take the plunge into inquiry using the resources we have gathered* to see what new insights into … [Read more...]

Today in History: O Captain! My Captain!

Today in History–February 9–the Library of Congress features a letter Walt Whitman wrote on this day in 1888 noting corrections to his poem "O Captain! My Captain!" published that year by The Riverside Literature Series No. 32. Whitman informed the publishers that they had not printed the most recent version Whitman had revised for the second time in 1871 (Whitman first wrote the poem in 1865, the year Lincoln was assassinated, and revised it for the first time soon after it was published). … [Read more...]