August 18, 2019

Today in History: Marian Anderson

Today in History–January 7–the Library of Congress features singer Marian Anderson, who made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City on his day in 1955. Barred from attending a Philadelphia music school because of her race, Anderson's family, friends and church helped fund private voice lessons. Although she toured Europe and the United States extensively, Anderson continued to suffer discrimination. In the most infamous incident, in 1939 Anderson was prohibited from performing … [Read more...]

Today in History: Daniel Chester French

Today in History–April 20–the Library of Congress features sculptor Daniel Chester French, born on this day in 1850. Encouraged to pursue a career as an artist by Louisa May Alcott, French completed his first big commission for the statue The Minute Man, when he was just 25.  Find out more about this preeminent monumental sculptor who also created the Lincoln Memorial sculpture by visiting the Today in History section, then follow the links below to access primary sources about French and the … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Mourning Lincoln & the Art of Tribute

From the Library of Congress bicentennial exhibition—With Malice Toward None—we learn a bit about the profound effect Abraham Lincoln's death had on people all over the world. The assassination of President Abraham Lincoln on Good Friday, April 14, 1865, had a tremendous impact both in the United States and abroad. People in Great Britain, which had favored the South, mourned as if Lincoln had been their leader. France, whose citizens had made no secret of their sympathy for the Union, paid … [Read more...]