July 17, 2018

Featured Source: Strong-Weak Government

Zoom into a more detailed image of this cartoon. Using only the details from the cartoon, what main point do you think the cartoonist was trying to make. For help reading cartoons, review It’s No Laughing Matter. Then review the cartoon's bibliographic record and this definition of carpetbagger. What insights into this cartoon does this new information provide you with? What questions do you still have? Compare and contrast this cartoon with this sheet music from 1868. Explain how you think … [Read more...]

Today in History: Robert M.T. Hunter

Today in History–April 21–the Library of Congress features southern politician Robert M.T. Hunter, born on this date in 1809. Hunter represented his home state of Virginia in the U.S. House of Representatives. He was the youngest Speaker of the House, serving from 1839 to 1841. From 1847 to 1861 Hunter served in the U.S. Senate. During the Civil War, he served as Confederate Secretary of State and in the Confederate Senate. Find out more by visiting the Today in History section, then follow the … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Primary Source Perspectives of the Civil War

Overview Primary sources can  help students grasp the reality and impact of historical events. This project connects students to people, events and daily life during the Civil War by having them report on selected topics using primary sources to research and illustrate their learning. To complete this project, students will . . . familiarize themselves with key Civil War events and people. gain an understanding and appreciation of the perspectives of the North and the South during the … [Read more...]

Today in History: William Faulkner

Today in History–September 25–the Library of Congress features writer William Faulkner, born on this day in 1897. Faulkner spent much of his youth in Oxford, Mississippi, later transforming what he knew into great literary works. A writer of deep insight, Faulkner also experimented with form and format; he won the 1949 Nobel Prize for Literature and two subsequent Pulitzer Prizes. Learn more about this master of American literature by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links … [Read more...]

Featured Source: An airship with a “Jim Crow” trailer

Explain what you think this political cartoon is trying to say, using details from the illustration to support your conclusions. Jim Crow is the name often used to refer to segregation laws and customs following the U.S. Civil War. Do you think this cartoon is a good argument for or against African American rights? Why? Jump this cartoon into the future. Create a similar cartoon that represents southern segregation laws and customs in the 1950s-60s America. What other observations, … [Read more...]