March 28, 2017

Teaching Now: Analyzing Primary Sources for Scientific Thinking & Organization

This is a guest post from Tom Bober (a.k.a. @CaptainLibrary), an elementary librarian at RM Captain Elementary in Clayton, Missouri and frequent contributor to the TPS Teachers Network. Earlier this school year I wrote about an activity in which third grade students analyzed primary sources from the Library of Congress, specifically the notes, diagrams, and writings of scientists to explore how scientists organize information. The hope was that students would connect these organizational … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Albert Einstein

Library of Congress blog posts Einstein at 100: Mapping the Universe Worlds Revealed: Geography & Maps December 2, 2015 Einstein’s Folklore December 18, 2013 Folklife Today Celebrate Einstein’s Birthday with Pi March 14, 2011 Inside Adams "Albert Einstein lived here" April 19, 1955 political cartoon by Herb Block (scroll down page to read curator's note) Albert Einstein image set Making Einstein theory of relativity easy as "ABC" The Morning Tulsa Daily World. (Tulsa, … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Marie Curie

Marie Curie was a brilliant and dedicated scientist who coined the term radioactivity. Her husband Pierre, also a scientist, was so excited about her research that he put his work on hold to help her make quicker progress on hers. In 1898 they discovered two new elements which they named polonium and radium. The Curies went won the 1903 Nobel Prize in Physics (shared with Henri Becquerel whose work they had built on) and Marie won the 1911 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. "The Life of Marie … [Read more...]

Featured Source: Hello, Earth! Hello!

Click the newspaper above to zoom in and read the article. Make a chart that lists the name of each scientist or inventor mentioned in the article, whether the expert was quoted directly or indirectly, and the expert's view of the possibility of communication with other planets. Find out more information about the publisher of this newspaper, then review the Analyzing Newspaper Articles post. Do you think this article is accurate and reliable? Why or why not? Compare and contrast this … [Read more...]

Today in History: Alexander Graham Bell

Today in History–March 10–the Library of Congress features Alexander Graham Bell, who made the first successful telephone call to his assistant Thomas Watson on this date in 1876. An audiologist, speech therapist and teacher of the deaf, Bell's knowledge of the nature of sound likely encourage his experimentation. Another Bell invention was a metal detector, that was created to help save President James A, Garfield. Unfortunately, the attempt to locate the assassin's bullet was unsuccessful. … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: George Washington Carver & Tuskegee Institute

From America's Library: Born: About 1864 (exact date is unknown) Died: January 5, 1943 George Washington Carver was born a slave in Diamond Grove, Missouri, around 1864. He is one of the nation's most famous agricultural scientists. He is best known for his research on peanuts and his commitment to helping poor Southern African American farmers. Carver worked at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama for most of his adult life. In 1943, soon after Carver's death, President Franklin D. Roosevelt … [Read more...]

Today in History: James Smithson & the Smithsonian Institution

Today in History–June 27–the Library of Congress features the Smithsonian Institution founded by James Smithson, who died on this date in 1829. A renowned British scientist, Smithson left the endowment to "increase and diffusion of knowledge among men." Find out more about the man and the institution that includes numerous museums and research centers in the Today in History section. Then click the links below to access more Library archives related to the Smithsonian. Of course, you'll also … [Read more...]

Today in History: Nuclear Fission

Today in History–December 2–the Library of Congress features nuclear fission. On this day in 1942 Enrico Fermi oversaw the first controlled nuclear fission chain reaction under the stands of the University of Chicago's Stagg Field. Find out more about Fermi and other scientists working on the project by visiting the Today in History section as well as the links below. Enrico Fermi image set Neils Bohr image set Lise Meitner image set J. Robert Oppenheimer image set Letter, … [Read more...]

Today in History: Mathematician & Astronomer Benjamin Banneker

Today in History–November 9–the Library of Congress features mathematician and astronomer Benjamin Banneker, born on this day in 1731. This largely self-taught surveyor and scientist influenced how African Americans were viewed during the Federal period. Learn more about Banneker by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access more primary sources and other resources related to Banneker, astronomy, and more. Benjamin Banneker's Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland … [Read more...]