March 24, 2017

Primary Source Learning: African American History & Culture

Primary Source sets with teacher guides Baseball: Across a Divided Society Harlem Renaissance Jim Crow in America The NAACP: A Century in the Fight for Freedom Featured Source guided primary source analysis activities Afro-American Monument An airship with a “Jim Crow” trailer Condition of the descendants of former African slaves The constitutional amendment Jesse Owens President Obama’s 2016 State of the Union Address Tree of Liberty Woman … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: The Negro Speaks of Rivers

Lesson overview Writer and poet Langston Hughes was a prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance movement, famous for his illuminating and moving depictions of African American life. "The Negro Speaks of Rivers" was Hughes's first published poem, appearing in the June 1921 issue of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) magazine The Crisis. Since that time, the poem has been set to music repeatedly, as shown by the sheet music illustrating this post. Lesson … [Read more...]

Today in History: Langston Hughes

Today in History–February 1–the Library of Congress features writer and poet Langston Hughes, born on this date in 1902. Famous for his illuminating and moving depictions of African American life, Hughes was a prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance movement. Learn more about this treasured American author by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access more stories, primary sources, and teaching and learning resources. Background Langston Hughes stories … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Ballad of Booker T.

Access the four drafts and the final version of Langston Hughes's poem "Ballad of Booker T." from the Library of Congress. For ideas on helping students to follow the poet's creative process, check out the Teaching with the Library of Congress blog's teaching ideas for using the marked-up drafts and final copy of Hughes’ poem “Ballad of Booker T.” You might also have students analyze primary sources to see if they think Hughes, in his poem, aptly described Washington. Would students add to or … [Read more...]