December 16, 2018

Timely Connections: Frederick Douglass & Scientific Racism

In an opinion piece for the New York Times, Eric Herschthal, a fellow at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at the New York Public Library, suggests that we remember Frederick Douglass "as someone whose insights about scientific theories of race are every bit as relevant in our era as they were when he wrote them." Take a look at the examples Herschthal provides about Douglass'  efforts to challenge scientific racism, including ethnology or, as it was sometimes referred to, "the … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Frederick A. Cook

How I reached the Pole audio recording by Frederick Albert CookFrederick A. Cook primary source setCook polar diaryFrederick A. Cook & the North Pole front-page newspaper coverageMore newspaper articles about Frederick A. Cook & the North PoleTopics in Chronicling America - The Race to the North PoleToday in History: Robert E. PearyFeatured Source: A coldness between them guided primary source analysis activitiesWho Discovered the North Pole? Smithsonian … [Read more...]

Today in History: Siege of Vicksburg

Today in History–May 19–the Library of Congress features the Union siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, begun on this day in 1863 under the command of General Ulysses S. Grant. By mid-June, nearly 80,000 Union troops had virtually sealed off the city. But it would take a few more weeks before Confederate forces surrendered on July 4. With the victory, the Union regained control of the Mississippi River, geographically dividing the Confederacy. Find out more about this Civil War campaign by visiting … [Read more...]

Today in History: James Polk

Today in History–November 5–the Library of Congress features James K. Polk, elected president of the United States on this day in 1844. Not so well known, Polk's victory by a narrow margin over Whig candidate Henry Clay was a surprise. A proponent of western expansion, Polk oversaw the addition of Texas and the acquisition of territory from Mexico, which included modern-day California, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, and parts of Colorado and Wyoming. Find out more by visiting … [Read more...]

Today in History: Brigham Young & the Mormon Pioneers

Today in History–July 24–the Library of Congress features Brigham Young and the Mormon pioneers, who arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah on this day in 1847. The weary group was happy to find their "promised land" after traveling some 1,000 miles from the Mormon settlement in Nauvoo, Illinois. Find out more by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access more primary sources related to this religious group and its founder.Brigham Young and the Mormon pioneers … [Read more...]

Today in History: First Telegraphic Message Sent

Today in History–May 24–the Library of Congress features the first telegraphic message, sent on this day in 1844 by Samuel F. B. Morse. This invention opened up a whole new era in communications. Learn more about Morse the inventor, Morse the painter, and the telegraph by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access numerous related primary sources.Samuel F.B. Morse Sent the First Telegraphic Message from America’s Library"The Magnetic Telegraph - it's … [Read more...]

Today in History: Lincoln Shot!

Today in History–April 14–the Library of Congress features the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, who was shot on this day in 1865. Learn more about tragic day in United States history by visiting the Today in History section, then follow the links below to access secondary sources, all types of primary sources, and teaching resources related to the death of President Lincoln.Lincoln assassination summary (overview, timeline, gallery)Assassination primary sourcesArtifacts … [Read more...]

Today in History: Theodore Roosevelt

Today in History–February 3–the Library of Congress features Theodore Roosevelt, who penned a personal love missive about his future wife on this day in 1880. That first marriage was, unfortunately, cut short by his wife's untimely death. But Roosevelt would marry again and had a long, prosperous life as a conservationist, progressive politician, and Nobel Peace Prize winner. Find out more about this larger than life figure in our nation's history by visiting the Today in History section, then … [Read more...]