July 23, 2017

Primary Source Learning: African American History & Culture

Primary Source sets with teacher guides Baseball: Across a Divided Society Harlem Renaissance Jim Crow in America The NAACP: A Century in the Fight for Freedom Featured Source guided primary source analysis activities Afro-American Monument An airship with a “Jim Crow” trailer Condition of the descendants of former African slaves The constitutional amendment Jesse Owens President Obama’s 2016 State of the Union Address Tree of Liberty Woman … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Lynching

Please be sure to review all primary sources prior to introducing students to them. You may also wish to read Selecting Primary Sources That Deal with Difficult Issues. Lynching by Helen Douglass 1859 manuscript "Lynch Law in the South" by Frederick Douglass The North American Review Volume 155, Issue 428 July 1892 Lynch Laws speech by Frederick Douglass The facts in the case of the horrible murder of little Myrtle Vance c 1893 Lessons of the Hour speech by Frederick Douglass, … [Read more...]

Today in History: Booker T. Washington

Today in History–September 18–the Library of Congress features Booker T. Washington, who delivered his famous "Atlanta Compromise" or Atlanta Exposition speech on this day in 1895. The speech delivered by this prominent African American leader advocated for advocate a moderate approach to race relations in the New South. Learn more about the founder and president of the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute (now Tuskegee University) by visiting the Today in History section, then click the … [Read more...]

Featured Source: Afro-American Monument

There are two Revolutionary War heroes depicted on this print who experienced very different outcomes. Who were the two men and what happened to each in the war? Review the 13 scenes related to Afro-American history on this lithograph. Which scene speaks most powerfully to you? Explain the reasoning for your choice. What scene would you add to this poster? Provide a brief sketch and a caption for the scene. Then explain why you feel this scene is important to African American … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Ballad of Booker T.

Access the four drafts and the final version of Langston Hughes's poem "Ballad of Booker T." from the Library of Congress. For ideas on helping students to follow the poet's creative process, check out the Teaching with the Library of Congress blog's teaching ideas for using the marked-up drafts and final copy of Hughes’ poem “Ballad of Booker T.” You might also have students analyze primary sources to see if they think Hughes, in his poem, aptly described Washington. Would students add to or … [Read more...]