August 4, 2020

Citizen U Bulletin: Volume 1, Issue 10

Bulletin

 

Volume 1, Issue 10

CIVICS IN ACTION

Citizen U

Weaving civics across grades and disciplines
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Featured Lessons: Political Parties

The Formation of Political Parties
In this lesson from the Democracy Project, students work in groups to investigate a case study using primary sources to help answer the question “Why do political parties form?” Students then use their learning to advise one of the two major U.S. political parties about a fledgling new “Teen Party”.
Political Parties – Beginning
In this lesson from Our American Voice, students investigate the major political parties in the United States and the role they play in U.S. elections, then create political parties focused on issues affecting students at their school.
Political Parties – Intermediate
In this lesson from Our American Voice, students investigate the two-party system in the United States and analyze partisan priorities, then create political parties that speak to issues affecting young people.
Political Parties – Advanced
In this lesson from Our American Voice, students gain a deeper understanding of political parties and the role they play in U.S. elections, evaluate how partisan priorities have changed over time, and then create political parties that speak to issues affecting young people as well as people of other generations.

TPS Civics Educator Micro-Credential Program

From the course discussions: “When I think of inspiring students, I really think about student motivation. For me, the best way for students to feel motivated and inspired is to build strong relationships with them. I am constantly talking with my students and looking for avenues of discussion, formally and informally, that we can build connections around. I constantly go out of my way to make connections with those quiet/shy students who would not talk once if you never called on them. In my classes, all students are allowed to be heard, regardless of background or previous interactions. Because all students have a voice, I really try to stick to that student choice component as a core class value. I think students feel more empowered when they can investigate what they are most interested in (while sticking to come designs and constraints) and the more interested they are, the more inspired and motivated they are to grow as students, learners, and young men and women.” Learn more

CARE Teaching & Learning Webinar Recordings

Webinar 1: Navigating Teacher & Student Stress in Uncertain Times
Webinar 2: Getting Student Attention When Teaching Remotely
Webinar 3: Keeping Students Engaged When Teaching Remotely
Webinar 4: Empowering Students When Teaching Remotely

Our American Voice

Action-based civics education program
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Oakwood Junior High
Oakwood CUSD 76



Komensky Elementary
Berwyn South School District 100



Prairie Trail Elementary Gurnee District 56



Healy Elementary
Chicago Public Schools



Piper Elementary
Berwyn South School District 100



Mattoon Middle School
Mattoon CUSD 2



Central Middle School
Evergreen Park Elementary SD 124



On Our Radar

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Primary Source Nexus Facebook Primary Source Nexus Twitter Primary Source Nexus website

TEACHING WITH
PRIMARY SOURCES

TPS Civics

Teaching with Primary Sources from the Library of Congress
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Protests That Changed America:
The March on Washington



Pride at 50: From Stonewall to Today



A Protester Who Changed America: Rosa Parks



When a Former Enslaved Person Debated
a Former Confederate
in the House of Representatives



Volunteering Against the Odds



From the TPS Teachers Network
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Primary Source Nexus

Teaching resource blog
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Featured Content from the Archives







TPS Program

News, Opportunities, Resources

2020 TPS Eastern Region Conference Materials and Session Recordings Available
Access

2021 National History Day Theme Book and Video launched
Communication in History: The Key to Understanding
Access

iCivics Module Investigates Eisenhower’s Executive Order 10730
Students will use the context from a newspaper coverage of the protests in Little Rock, Eisenhower’s own speech explaining his order, and the U.S. Constitution to explain why an executive order was used to desegregate Central High.
Access (login required)

Let’s Make Bubbles: Connecting History and STEM
Teaching with the Library of Congress
Access

Library Offers Online LGBTQ History Resources
Access

Nevertheless, They Persisted
New primary-source based curriculum for middle-high school that teaches the history of woman suffrage in Oregon
Access

Now Online: The Ainu and Ezochi Rare Collection
Books, manuscripts, and maps produced during the 18th and 19th centuries that document Japanese exploration and observation of the island and prefecture now known as Hokkaido in Japan, as well as Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands in Russia
Access

Scholarship Opportunity for Teachers & Pre-service Teachers grades 4-12
Access
National History Day
August 17 – December 14, 2020 with live webinars at 7 p.m. EST September 14, October 14, November 11, December 9
Information/Application

Televising Black Politics in the Black Power Era: Black Journal
New content from American Archives of Public Broadcasting
Access

Using Primary Source Sets in Remote Learning Environments
Teaching with the Library of Congress
Access

Online Professional Development

2020 Summer Webinars
Library of Congress
Wednesdays 2:00-3:00pm EST through August 5
Free, certificate for 1 hour of professional development available for live webinar participants
Information & Recordings

  • July 8: Foundations: Selecting Primary Sources Register
  • July 15: Learning to Teach All Over Again: Teachers’ Reflections on Using Primary Source Analysis to Engage English Learners in Critical Democratic Discussions Register
  • July 22: Foundations: Analyzing Multiple Perspectives Register
  • July 29: Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words Register
  • Aug. 5: Foundations: Information Literacy and Primary Sources Register

NHD Virtual Professional Development
National History Day & Partners
June 14 to September 4, 2020
Access

Teaching the History’s Mysteries K-5 Curriculum – Workshop
Collaborative for Educational Services
July 16-December 15, with online sessions July 16 & 23 and November 11 from 7:00-8:00pm EST
Low fee – 10 PDPs + graduate credits available for additional fee
Register

Posters for the People: Using WPA Sources
TPS UArts
Jul 27-Aug 7, 9-11am EST
$50 registration fee + graduate credits available for additional feeInformation & registration

From the TPS Teachers Network
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Library Blog Round-Up

Recent favorites
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Hearing Frederick Douglass:
His Speech on John Brown



Jason Reynolds: Writing Challenges

Great videos laying out fun writing activities.

Documenting a Step Toward Marriage Equality



Butterflies, Beetles, and Bees, Oh My!
National Pollinator Week



The Battle of Greasy Grass



Honoring African American Contributions
in Medicine: Midwives



The Moon



Amelia Earhart:
In the Cockpit and in the Public Eye



Ralph Ellison’s “Juneteenth”



Up, Up, and Away with 19th Century
Science Books for Children



Kids Explain Their Rhymes, Games, and Songs



A Conservator’s Virtual Examination
of the “Codex Quetzalecatzin”



Harriet Tubman:
Conductor on the Underground Railroad



Theodore Roosevelt: A President of “Firsts”



From the Pros in the Field

Teaching & Learning with Primary Sources
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Primary Source Nexus Facebook Primary Source Nexus Twitter Primary Source Nexus website

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