October 17, 2017

Using Sources: Chronicling America Newspaper Pages

Historic newspapers contain a wealth of information about the past, providing a snapshot of social and cultural values of a certain place and time. You will find news stories, feature articles, editorials, cartoons, advertisements, stories, poems, art and more. All of these can be useful to help contextualize events and people from history. According to the Center for History and New Media, George Mason University, “Historians generally use newspapers for three purposes: learning facts about … [Read more...]

Using Sources: Printing High Quality Black & White Primary Source Images

Here is very simple tip from TPS-Barat for printing high-quality black & white or sepia images that we use in our in-person workshops: ask the print shop to use a color printer to print the black and white images and print them on business-card card stock. And don't forget to ask if they have educator discounts! For more information on saving high-quality images, check out Using Sources: Saving High Resolution Images. … [Read more...]

Using Sources: Saving High Resolution Images

Many images from the Library of Congress are available in several formats: lower resolution JPEG (.jpg), higher resolution JPEG (.jpg too but a larger file size) and TIFF (.tif). TIFF files are the largest and, therefore, the highest resolution files. TIFF files are often crucial to focus on analyzing small text or other details in primary source cartoons and images. To facilitate student analysis of TIFF files and to save limited network drive space, you can save these files as PDF (.pdf) … [Read more...]

Using Sources: Creating a Digital Annotated Bibliography

Cornell University Library describes an annotated bibliography as "a list of citations to books, articles, and documents. Each citation is followed by a brief (usually about 150 words) descriptive and evaluative paragraph, the annotation."Lisa Oppenheim from the Chicago Metro History Education Center notes that annotations for National History Day (NHD) and Chicago Metro History Fair should be around 50 words and not much longer than 75 words. Annotated bibliographies serve one or more of the … [Read more...]

Using Sources: Citing Digitized Sources from the Library

The Library of Congress offers more than 20 million digitized primary sources available to researchers of all ages. When using these sources in learning projects, it is important to provide citations of the primary sources. Citing primary sources requires students to think carefully about the source—who created/published/distributed it, when was it created, and from where was it accessed. Citing sources ensures that full credit is given to the creators and publishers of sources and that others … [Read more...]

Using Sources: Viewing, Saving & Printing Maps

Overview The Library of Congress cartographic collection is the largest in the world and contains millions of maps, thousands of which are available online from the LOC.gov website. The Library interface allows you to zoom into these digitized maps in incredible detail simply through your web browser, save the maps in a variety of sizes for offline viewing, and even print the maps out. Viewing maps online Click on an item from a search result to view the map's bibliographic record and a … [Read more...]

Using Sources: Viewing & Saving Primary Sources from American Memory

Overview American Memory is a collection of nearly 150 collections containing millions of primary sources related to American culture and history. Below you will find tips for accessing and saving primary source items from the American Memory collections. Viewing & saving prints, photographs, images of text documents The Library of Congress American Memory collections contain hundreds of thousands of of prints, photographs, and images of text documents. While you will find some of these … [Read more...]

Using Sources: Civil War Photography Technology & Tricks

The Civil War Glass Negatives collection provides access to about 7,000 views and portraits made during the American Civil War (1861-1865) and its immediate aftermath, many by Mathew Brady (biographical note) and Alexander Gardner. Taking photographs during the Civil War was a complex, time-consuming process difficult to master in a studio setting and even more difficult when working outdoors. Photographers mixed their own chemicals and prepared their own wet plate glass negatives. … [Read more...]