March 28, 2017

Featured Source: Has the war ruined the country?

Read the headline and the four lines of text just under the headline. Then look at the footer text at the bottom of this page. Who do you think was the audience for this broadside? Explain the reasoning behind your conclusion. (Hint: If you need help answering this, there is one particular word that you should research.) What can you learn about the evidence referenced in this broadside just by looking at the diagrams? (Don't read the text below the diagrams yet!) Access a larger version … [Read more...]

Connecting to the Common Core: Close Reading Markup Strategies

The plan today had been to post a CCSS-aligned primary source activity focused on close reading of images and texts but input from a great group of teachers at a professional development session necessitated a blog detour. So, instead, we'll share a close reading markup strategy remix and resource list that TPS-Barat put together for another recent PD session. Keep in mind that close reading strategies can be used to dive deep into texts as well as a variety of other primary source types. What … [Read more...]

Featured Image: President Obama’s 2013 Inauguration Address

    Image powered by Wordle™: View image online at Wordle.net Text: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/01/21/inaugural-address-president-barack-obama President Barack Obama works on his inaugural address with Jon Favreau, Director of Speechwriting, not pictured, in the Oval Office Jan. 16, 2013 Featured Image: President Obama’s 2012 State of the Union Address   … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Gettysburg Address Image Sequencing

The Union victory over Confederate forces at the Battle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863) is considered a major turning point in the Civil War. But it was also the costliest in terms of human lives—more than 51,000, nearly one-third of all forces engaged, were killed, reported missing, or wounded.[1] Soon after, a project to build a cemetery for the Union dead began. Two men spoke at the dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery on November 19, 1863. Edward Everett, a well-known orator, … [Read more...]

Today in History: Captivity Narratives

Today in History–February 29–the Library of Congress features captivity narratives. On this day in 1704, French soldiers and their Native American allies raided a frontier settlement in Massachusetts, killing many and forcing more to march through heavy snows to Canada (New France). Read more about this incident and other captivity narratives by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access some fascinating primary sources. Texts Captives among the … [Read more...]

Featured Image: President Obama’s 2012 State of the Union Address

Image powered by Wordle™: View image online at Wordle.net Text: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2011/01/25/remarks-president-state-union-address … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: I Have a Dream Image Sequencing

On August 28, 1963 a march organized by supporters of stronger civil rights legislation drew more than 250,000 people to Washington, D.C. Encouraged and inspired, Martin Luther King, Jr. strayed from the short speech he had prepared and delivered instead his famous extemporaneous I Have a Dream speech from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Primary sources can help students better understand the power and significance of this historic speech.  In addition to having students complete an image … [Read more...]

Connecting to the Common Core: Image Sequencing Activities

Image sequencing activities help students better understand written or spoken texts. Image sequencing requires groups of students to review an image set and match individual images with designated lines of text, discussing and justifying their choices. These activities give students great practice in the skills emphasized by the Common Core State Standards, particularly the CCSS standards related to Speaking & Listening and Language (vocabulary). When creating image sequencing activities, … [Read more...]

Today in History: The Federalist Papers

Today in History–October 27–the Library of Congress features the Federalist Papers, the first of which was published on this day in 1787. This series of essays, 85 in all, were published in newspapers under the name of Publius but were actually written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay. Their purpose, in essence, was to argue for the necessity of checks and balances in the new government. Learn more by visiting the Today in History section and accessing the resources linked to … [Read more...]

Today in History: Rails & Robbers

Today in History–October 6–the Library of Congress features the robbery of an eastbound Ohio & Mississippi Railroad passenger train near Seymour, Indiana on this day in 1866. Fortunately,  detectives from the Pinkerton National Detective Agency quickly identified the criminals. Learn more about train robberies in the Today in History section then click the links below to access loads of train resources. The great train robbery, film by Thomas Edison Train robbers image set American … [Read more...]