July 24, 2017

Analyzing Primary Sources: Sensory Exploration

The sensory exploration graphic organizer is a great way to introduce students, especially younger ones, to primary source analysis. It also helps with vocabulary development. Encourage students to write words in each column for each sense. After, you may have students create a poem of their choice using the words they brainstormed; they may choose to write the poem from the point of view of someone outside the image or from a person, animal, or thing inside the image. If students drew images, … [Read more...]

Today in History: The New Deal

Today in History–June 16–the Library of Congress features the New Deal. On this date in 1933, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) signed the National Industrial Recovery Act, which created the Public Works Administration. FDR's New Deal domestic agenda provided jobs through a series of public works programs. In fact, millions of Americans found work through programs such as the Works Progress Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. Find out more … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Teddy Bears

Teddy bears got their name from Theodore Roosevelt. He had a soft heart for animals in general and in particular for a bear that his aides cornered and thought he would like as a hunting trophy. The incident inspired the cartoon illustration above which, in turn, inspired a New York toy store owner to create a toy stuffed bear he called "Teddy's bear".  Below you can find out more of the story and then explore teddy bear resources from the Library of Congress. The teddy bear story from … [Read more...]

Featured Source: A Thanksgiving Truce

Why do you think the creator titled this cartoon "A Thanksgiving Truce"? Use specific details from the source to support your response. What do you think the bear meant when it said (with deep feeling), "Here's hoping that when next we meet, we see you first."? Do some research to learn some more about Theodore Roosevelt and the Rough Riders. What discoveries did you make? What new perspectives of this cartoon do you now have? What other observations, reflections or questions does this … [Read more...]

Today in History: William McKinley

Today in History–September 06–the Library of Congress features President William McKinley, shot on this day in 1901 just six months after his second inauguration. President McKinley died eight days later, reportedly while singing his favorite hymn, "Nearer my God to Thee, Nearer to Thee". Anarchist Leon Czolgosz is found guilty of assassinating the president and is executed less than two months later. Learn more  by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access more … [Read more...]

Featured Source: Letter with illustrated fable

  This source is listed as a letter with illustrated fable. What is the moral or lesson of the story? Write and illustrate your own brief fable that contains a moral. Read more about the author and recipient of this letter. What interesting information did you uncover? What other observations, reflections or questions does this source inspire? Let us know! … [Read more...]

Today in History: John Burroughs

Today in History–April 3–the Library of Congress features writer and naturalist John Burroughs, born on this day in 1837. Learn more about this contemporary of John Muir and Henry David Thoreau by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access images and some of his writings and photographs as well as more environment and conservation teaching resources and primary sources from the Library. Winter sunshine by John Burroughs (1876) "In Warbler Time" by John … [Read more...]

Today in History: Theodore Roosevelt

Today in History–February 3–the Library of Congress features Theodore Roosevelt, who penned a personal love missive about his future wife on this day in 1880. That first marriage was, unfortunately, cut short but Roosevelt had a long, prosperous life as a conservationist, progressive politician, and Nobel Peace Prize winner. Find out more about this larger than life figure in our nation's history by visiting the Today in History section, then follow the links below to access more resources and … [Read more...]

Today in History: John James Audubon

Today in History–January 27–the Library of Congress features John James Audubon, who died on this date in 1851. Audubon was a naturalist and artist, earning fame for his drawings and paintings of North American birds. Learn more about the namesake of the National Audubon Society by visiting the Today in History section then click the links below to access more related primary sources. John James Audubon primary source set Select Audubon Birds of America drawings More Audubon … [Read more...]

Today in History: Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Today in History–January 20–the Library of Congress features Franklin Delano Roosevelt, inaugurated as U.S. President in January on this day in 1937. This was the first inauguration held in January but FDR's second of four inaugurations, his first was held on March 4, 1933. Find out more about the longest serving president in our nation’s history by visiting the Today in History section, then follow the links below to access more resources and individual primary sources related to the 32nd … [Read more...]