September 26, 2017

Primary Source Spotlight: Marie Curie

Marie Curie was a brilliant and dedicated scientist who coined the term radioactivity. Her husband Pierre, also a scientist, was so excited about her research that he put his work on hold to help her make quicker progress on hers. In 1898 they discovered two new elements which they named polonium and radium. The Curies went won the 1903 Nobel Prize in Physics (shared with Henri Becquerel whose work they had built on) and Marie won the 1911 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. "The Life of Marie … [Read more...]

Today in History: Mathematician & Astronomer Benjamin Banneker

Today in History–November 9–the Library of Congress features mathematician and astronomer Benjamin Banneker, born on this day in 1731. This largely self-taught surveyor and scientist influenced how African Americans were viewed during the Federal period. Learn more about Banneker by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access more primary sources and other resources related to Banneker, astronomy, and more. Benjamin Banneker's Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Science Radium Romp

The Teaching with the Library of Congress blog highlighted the Radium Dance song sheet cover and gave some great science-related teaching ideas for using the Chronicling America historical newspaper collection to make historical connections to the Curie discovery of radium and early popular uses for this chemical element. Another idea would be to have students work in groups to see what they can learn and what questions can they generate from this radium-related primary source set. At the … [Read more...]