July 22, 2017

Today in History: Ernest Hemingway

Today in History–July 21–the Library of Congress features writer Ernest Hemingway, born on this day in 1899 in Oak Park, Illinois. Like his father, Hemingway was a hunting and outdoors enthusiast. Seeking adventure, he served as an ambulance driver in Italy in World War I, reported on the Spanish Civil War, and worked as a foreign correspondent in Europe during World War II. Hemingway received a Pulitzer Prize in 1953 for his novel The Old Man and the Sea and the Nobel Prize for Literature in … [Read more...]

Today in History: Mathew Brady

Today in History–February 27–the Library of Congress features Mathew Brady who photographed presidential hopeful Abraham Lincoln before a speech on this day in 1860. At successful studio photographer, Brady set out to document the people, places and events of the Civil War. The historical impact of the endeavor is priceless but at the time, left him penniless. Find out more about the father of photojournalism by visiting the Today in History section, this brief Brady bio from the Prints & … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: W.E.B. Du Bois

From America's Library: Born: February 23, 1868 Died: August 27, 1963 William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was a noted scholar, editor, and African American activist. Du Bois was a founding member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP -- the largest and oldest civil rights organization in America). Throughout his life Du Bois fought discrimination and racism. He made significant contributions to debates about race, politics, and history in the United States in the … [Read more...]

Presidential Spotlight: John Tyler

From America’s Library: Born: March 29, 1790 Died: January 18, 1862 John Tyler, 10th president of the United States, was called "His Accidency" by his foes because he was the first president to get the job without being elected to it. He took the helm when President Harrison died after only one month in office. Tyler had other "firsts" as president: His first wife was the first wife to die while her husband was still president, and he was the first president to marry while in … [Read more...]

Today in History: George Gershwin & Gullah Culture

Today in History–September 2–the Library of Congress features George Gershwin, who completed the orchestral score of the opera—Porgy and Bess—based on the DuBose Heyward novel on this date in 1935. The opera, like the novel, depicted the African-American Gullah culture of South Carolina. Learn more about this remarkable man and his collaborators on the internationally known opera by visiting the Today in History section and clicking the links below. George Gershwin portraits Porgy and … [Read more...]

Today in History: John Trumbull

Today in History–June 6–the Library of Congress features artist John Trumbull, born on this day in 1756 in Lebanon, Connecticut. Before he began painting, this son of Connecticut governor Jonathan Trumbull, served as an aide to General George Washington during the Revolution. Trumbull painted portraits of leading figures of the day and is best known for his historical paintings that adorn the rotunda of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., including the Declaration of … [Read more...]

Today in History: Ella Fitzgerald

Today in History–April 25–the Library of Congress features Ella Fitzgerald, born on this date in 1917. One of the greatest jazz singers of all time, Fitzgerald got her start at Amateur Night at Harlem's Apollo Theater and went on to win 13 Grammys, including two of the first awarded in 1958. Learn more about this legendary vocal artist by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access some more primary sources. Ella Fitzgerald from America's … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Presidential Portraits

George Washington and Abraham Lincoln are two of the most famous U.S. presidents. This project helps students to learn about these presidents through the lens of both primary and secondary sources. Students will also investigate different types of primary sources, learn how portraits are created to convey information, and consider their own presidential potential. To complete this project, students will . . . identify various types of primary sources. learn facts about George Washington … [Read more...]

Primary Source Learning: Women in the White House

As the 2012 U.S. presidential election heats up, there is a lot of talk not just about President Barack Obama and the Republican challenger Mitt Romney, but also about their wives, Michelle Obama and Ann Romney. Use the resources below to learn about the women in the White House and the some of the roles various first ladies took on throughout the years. One fun learning activity comes from the Collection Connections section of Words and Deeds in American History. Ask students to consider if … [Read more...]

Today in History: Althea Gibson & Tennis

Today in History–July 6–the Library of Congress features Althea Gibson, who won the women's singles title at Wimbledon  on this date in 1957. This tennis star fought hard against racism just for the right to compete. In addition to more Wimbledon singles and doubles titles, Gibson won U.S. Nationals titles as well as French and Italian Open titles. Find out more about this fantastic athlete in the Today in History section, then click the links below to access portraits of Althea Gibson and … [Read more...]