May 26, 2017

Primary Source Spotlight: Esther Bubley

Esther Bubley images +2,000 Esther Bubley biographical information & collection guide Women Come to the Front: Esther Bubley background information & select images Ladies Behind the Lens Library of Congress Blog November 29, 2016 Women Photojournalists Picture This January 8, 2016 Documenting America, 1935-1943: The Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Photo Collection streaming webcast Esther Bubley Photography Archive   … [Read more...]

Primary Source Learning: Civil War

Civil War photograph lessons & activities The Mathew Brady Bunch New Technologies and New Uses Using Sources: Civil War Photography Technology & Tricks What Do You See? Civil War Photojournalism: A Record of War The Civil War Through a Child’s Eye Collection Connections teaching strategies & activities Abraham Lincoln Papers Alfred Whital Stern Collection of Lincolniana Civil War Maps Civil War Soldier in the Wild Cat Regiment Poet at Work: … [Read more...]

Today in History: Samuel H. Gottscho and William H. Schleisner

  Today in History–June 21–the Library of Congress features Samuel H. Gottscho and William H. Schleisner. On this date in 1934, Samuel Herman Gottscho snapped a photograph of the north facade of the Nebraska state capitol in Lincoln. A photography enthusiast, Gottscho was a traveling salesman for 23 year before becoming a professional photographer in 1925 at the age of fifty. His son-in-law William H. Schleisner joined him in the business in 1935. Find out more by visiting the Today in … [Read more...]

Today in History: Mathew Brady

Today in History–February 27–the Library of Congress features Mathew Brady who photographed presidential hopeful Abraham Lincoln before a speech on this day in 1860. At successful studio photographer, Brady set out to document the people, places and events of the Civil War. The historical impact of the endeavor is priceless but at the time, left him penniless. Find out more about the father of photojournalism by visiting the Today in History section, this brief Brady bio from the Prints & … [Read more...]

Today in History: Gilbert Grosvenor & National Geographic

Today in History–October 28–the Library of Congress features editor and president of the National Geographic Society, Gilbert Hovey Grosvenor, born on this date in 1875. Just 9 years after immigrating from Turkey to the United States, Grosvenor began working as an assistant editor at National Geographic upon the recommendation of family friend Alexander Graham Bell. Just four years later he became the magazine's editor-in-chief. Grosvenor developed the photographic and cartographic departments, … [Read more...]

Featured Image: Cedar and wood carvings

KMS (Ken Schels' website) … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Zooming into Documentary Photography

Zoom into the picture above and you will see a face recognizable to many. The mother in the photo is Florence Thompson, most famously known as the migrant mother. This photograph was one in a series taken in 1936 by Resettlement Administration photographer Dorothea Lange. In this primary source activity, students will examine photographs individually and as a set. They will then analyze a variety of primary sources and texts to use as evidence in an essay that defines documentary photography, … [Read more...]

Today in History: Walker Evans

Today in History–July 16–the Library of Congress features photojournalist Walker Evans. On this date in 1936 Evans took a leave of absence from from the Farm Security Administration (FSA) to accept a summer assignment with Fortune magazine. Evans and writer James McGee  worked together to document the lives of sharecropper families in Alabama, which would eventually be published in the book, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. Learn more by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links … [Read more...]

Today in History: Dorothea Lange

Today in History–October 11–the Library of Congress features photographer Dorothea Lange, who died on this day in 1965. Best known for her "Migrant Mother" photo, Lange began her career as a studio photographer. During the Depression she took her camera to the street, photographing the homeless. These images led to her employment with the federal Resettlement Administration (RA), and its successor agency, the Farm Security Administration (FSA).  Learn more about this Lange by visiting … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Capturing Character on Camera

The Today in History section for July 10 features Jelly Roll Morton, one of jazz music's primary influences. From 1938 to 1948, William P. Gottlieb took over 1600 photographs of celebrated jazz artists. Carl Van Vechten also took a similar number of photographs of celebrities, including many figures from the Harlem Renaissance. The Library has two great resources for learning about the art of photography and how photographers capture and present a music performer's character on camera, which we … [Read more...]