April 25, 2017

Primary Source Spotlight: Race Riots

Wilmington, North Carolina 1898 race riot 1898 newspaper coverage New York City 1900 race riots August, 1900: select newspaper articles more 1900 newspaper coverage Atlanta, Georgia 1906 race riot 1906 newspaper coverage E. W. Evans oral history transcript Atlanta riot recollections Letter from Francis Jackson Garrison to Booker T. Washington concerning the Atlanta Riot October 7, 1906 Mary White Ovington covered the Atlanta riot Journalist Ray Stannard Baker after … [Read more...]

Today in History: Manhattan Island

Today in History–May 4–the Library of Congress features Manhattan Island. On this date in 1626, Dutch colonist Peter Minuit arrived on the wooded island at the behest of the Dutch West India Company. Minuit later "purchased" the island from resident Algonquin Indians for the equivalent of $24.  The town of New Amsterdam, located at the southern end of the island, was renamed New York City after it was seized by the British in 1664. Find out more about Manhattan Island by visiting the Today in … [Read more...]

Featured Source: Astor Theatre – The Great Ziegfeld

Where do you think this photograph was taken? Zoom into the photo and describe this place using details from the image to inform your description. (Save the link in the previous sentence to download the image to your computer which will allow you to zoom in with greater detail.) Next, make a guess at what decade this photo is from and describe what you think life was like at this time. Review the bibliographic record for this primary source. Then do some research and find out what this … [Read more...]

Literature Links: And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street

Theodor Geisel—a.k.a. Dr. Seuss—was born in 1904 in Springfield, Massachusetts. And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street was the first of many children's books that he wrote and illustrated. Geisel supposedly received 27 rejections before the book was published by Vanguard Press in 1937 thanks, as the story goes, to a chance run-in with and old friend from Darthmouth College. After reading the book, engage your students with some of the following primary source activities. Have your … [Read more...]

City Spotlight: New York City

New York City maps Featured Sources & Images Featured Source: Astor Theatre – The Great Ziegfeld Featured Source: Hippodrome Theater Featured Image: Outside watch shop Featured Image: Engine Company 54 lost 15 men, 9/11/01 Greater New York Illustrated: Over one hundred and fifty photographic views of the foremost city of the western hemisphere (1898) New York City images from American Memory More New York City images New York City historical newspapers New … [Read more...]

Featured Image: Outside watch shop

[Read more...]

Today in History: Empire State Building

Today in History–May 1–the Library of Congress features New York's Empire State Building, opened on this day in 1931. President Herbert Hoover participated in the event by pressing a ceremonial button in Washington, D.C., thus, "turning on" the lights. The Empire State Building held the record for tallest building in the world until 1972. Still a New York tourist attraction, it is infamous for being the building that King Kong climbs. Learn more about this iconic building and other early … [Read more...]

Today in History: Victor Herbert

Today in History–February 1–the Library of Congress features composer Victor Herbert, born on this date in 1859 in Dublin, Ireland. After immigrating to the United States in 1886 with his wife, opera singer Therese Foerster, Herbert quickly became active in the musical life of New York City. Herbert worked with worked for the Metropolitan Opera, was bandmaster of the 22nd Regiment Band of New York, directed the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, and then formed the Victor Herbert Orchestra. Learn … [Read more...]

Today in History: Williamsburg Bridge

Today in History–December 19–the Library of Congress features New York City's Williamsburg Bridge, opened on this day in 1903. Built to alleviate traffic on the Brooklyn Bridge, the Williamsburg Bridge was the largest of three steel-frame suspension bridges to eventually span the city’s East River.  Find out more by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access more primary sources related to the Williamsburg Bridge, the Brooklyn Bridge, suspension bridges, and … [Read more...]

Today in History: William “Boss” Tweed

Today in History–December 4–the Library of Congress features New York City politician William "Boss" Tweed, who escaped from jail on this day in 1875. As leader of New York City's Democratic Party, Tweed and his Tammany Hall cronies stole millions of dollars from the city. A vigorous campaign to unseat Tweed was ultimately successful when he was tried and convicted on charges of forgery and larceny in November 1873. Tweed was released in January 1875 but the state sued him for $6 million and he … [Read more...]