May 25, 2017

Primary Source Spotlight: Dorothea Dix

Dorothea L. Dix (1802-1887) was an actively engaged citizen who tirelessly advocated for help for the less fortunate, particularly the mentally ill. Use the resources below to learn more. Dorothea Lynde Dix portrait Dorothea Lynde Dix to Abraham Lincoln, Monday, June 17, 1861 (transcription) To the Legislature of Massachusetts [protesting against the confinement of insane persons and idiots in almshouses and prisons] Dorothea Dix 1843 Memorial soliciting a state hospital for the … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Wampanoag

The Wampanoag the tribe in Massachusetts is famous for having helped the Pilgrims to survive the first difficult winters in America. Learn more by clicking through to the links below. Images Wampanoag image set Massasoit and his warriors Massasoit--On his way to meet the Pilgrims and sign the Peace Treaty Goffe rallying the men of Hadley [in defense of Indian attack during King Philip's War, Hadley, Mass., 1675-76] Historic newspaper coverage Massasoit 1838-1922 King … [Read more...]

Literature Links: And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street

Theodor Geisel—a.k.a. Dr. Seuss—was born in 1904 in Springfield, Massachusetts. And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street was the first of many children's books that he wrote and illustrated. Geisel supposedly received 27 rejections before the book was published by Vanguard Press in 1937 thanks, as the story goes, to a chance run-in with and old friend from Darthmouth College. After reading the book, engage your students with some of the following primary source activities. Have your … [Read more...]

Today in History: Henry Cabot Lodge

Today in History–May 12–the Library of Congress features politician and historian Henry Cabot Lodge, born on this day in 1850. Lodge was a long-standing member of Congress, serving the state of Massachusetts as a U.S. representative from 1887 to 1893 and a U.S. senator from 1893 to 1924. This Republican statesman is perhaps best known for his staunch argument against U.S. participation in the League of Nations proposed by President Woodrow Wilson. Find out more about this fiery orator by … [Read more...]

Featured Source: Massachusetts Did It

What is the definition of radicalism? Do you agree with the cartoonist's choice to represent radicalism with a snake? Why or why not? Read the notes for this political cartoon. Do you think the elephant was a good choice to represent the G.O.P, or Republican party? Why or why not? Use the Primary Source Nexus search box to look for more information about Calvin Coolidge. What else did you learn about his political career? What other observations, reflections or questions does this … [Read more...]

State Spotlight: Massachusetts

Massachusetts stories from America’s Library Massachusetts primary source set Massachusetts maps Pictorial Americana: Selected images of Massachusetts More Massachusetts images Featured Image: Massachusetts Did It Photographs of the sea floor of western Massachusetts Bay July 1999 Massachusetts historic films Massachusetts oral histories Massachusetts song recordings Whaling song Young Johhny Massachusetts sheet music & song sheets Massachusetts books … [Read more...]

City Spotlight: Boston, Massachusetts

Boston maps Boston image set from American Memory More Boston images Canoeing on the Charles River, Boston, Mass 1904 film TR attends his son Archie's wedding at Boston 1917 Boston books & articles Boston correspondence, reports, printed ephemera & other texts Boston sheet music "The Boston Burglar" song lyrics Boston songs (audio recordings) Boston legislation State Spotlight: Massachusetts … [Read more...]

Today in History: St. Patrick’s Day

Today in History–March 17–the Library of Congress features St. Patrick's Day. This Irish and Irish-American holiday commemorates the death of the patron saint of Ireland who, as legend has it, died on this date circa 492. The holiday has been celebrated in the United States since the 18th century. Across the country today, many people celebrate with parades and by wearing the color green. Learn more by visiting the Today in History section, then follow the links below to uncover St. Patrick's … [Read more...]

Featured Image: The Gerry-mander

Curator's note In 1812, Jeffersonian Republicans forced through the Massachusetts legislature a bill rearranging district lines to assure them an advantage in the upcoming senatorial elections. Although Governor Elbridge Gerry had only reluctantly signed the law, a Federalist editor is said to have exclaimed upon seeing the new district lines, "Salamander! Call it a Gerrymander." This cartoon-map first appeared in the Boston Gazette for March 26, 1812. … [Read more...]

Today in History: Henry David Thoreau

Today in History–July 12–the Library of Congress features writer, philosopher, and naturalist Henry David Thoreau, born on this day in 1817. Thoreau put his belief in living simply to the test by spending two years in a cabin on the edge of Walden Pond, a small glacial lake near Concord, Massachusetts. Find out more about this fascinating man by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to read his works and discover other primary sources. Henry David Thoreau from … [Read more...]