November 22, 2017

Today in History: Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis

Today in History–July 28–the Library of Congress features Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis, born on this date in 1929. One of the United States' most prominent first ladies, Kennedy focused on restoring the White House and was a great supporter of the arts. She was in the motorcade with President John F. Kennedy the day he was shot. In 1968 Kennedy married Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. After his death in 1975, she launched a successful publishing career. Find out more by visiting … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Albert Einstein

Library of Congress blog posts Einstein at 100: Mapping the Universe Worlds Revealed: Geography & Maps December 2, 2015 Einstein’s Folklore December 18, 2013 Folklife Today Celebrate Einstein’s Birthday with Pi March 14, 2011 Inside Adams "Albert Einstein lived here" April 19, 1955 political cartoon by Herb Block (scroll down page to read curator's note) Albert Einstein image set Making Einstein theory of relativity easy as "ABC" The Morning Tulsa Daily World. (Tulsa, … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Robert Frost

Christmas Greetings from Robert Frost From the Catbird Seat December 24, 2014 First Drafts: Poem for a President Library of Congress blog January 29, 2013 Stay Gold: Robert Frost and First Poems From the Catbird Seat June 5, 2013 Robert Frost Reads Poem at JFK's Inauguration January 20, 1961 from America's Library "Dedication" Robert Frost's Presidential Inaugural Poem typescript with Frost's holograph script corrections in ink The Poetry of Robert Frost: "Dedication" Featured … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Marie Curie

Marie Curie was a brilliant and dedicated scientist who coined the term radioactivity. Her husband Pierre, also a scientist, was so excited about her research that he put his work on hold to help her make quicker progress on hers. In 1898 they discovered two new elements which they named polonium and radium. The Curies went won the 1903 Nobel Prize in Physics (shared with Henri Becquerel whose work they had built on) and Marie won the 1911 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. "The Life of Marie … [Read more...]

Today in History: Charles Julius Guiteau

Today in History–December 31–the Library of Congress features presidential assassin Charles Julius Guiteau. On this date in 1881, Guiteau penned a New Year's letter to his jailer while awaiting trial for the assassination of President James Garfield.  On July 2, 1881 Guiteau had shot the newly elected president who died seventy-nine days later of infections from the bullet wound. Guiteau's trial was a national sensation and one of the first insanity pleas entered in a court of law. Discover more … [Read more...]

Today in History: Washington’s Continental Congress Correspondence

Today in History–March 24–the Library of Congress features a letter George Washington wrote to the Continental Congress on this date in 1776, one week after British troops evacuated Boston but remained nearby. In the letter General Washington expressed his surprise and disappointment at the situation and went on to describe the exploits of the British in the area. During the Revolution, Washington maintained frequent correspondence with Congress. Learn more by visiting the Today in … [Read more...]

Featured Source: Leonard Bernstein illustrated letter

Leonard Bernstein was a famous American composer and conductor. Don't read the words, just study the illustrations. What is the setting? What is the story? If you like, zoom into the image online. Next, look carefully at the rest of the zoom into the image. What more can you learn solely by analyzing the illustrations? Now read the letter. Challenge yourself to decipher the writing on the pages, then read the transcript. (Teacher note: the end of the letter contains one word of strong … [Read more...]

Today in History: Siege of Fort Meigs

Today in History–May 9–the Library of Congress features the siege of Fort Meigs by Shawnee military leader Tecumseh and British general Henry A. Proctor  on this day in 1813.  But the invaders were unsuccessful as General William Henry Harrison held onto the fort that he had ordered built on the Maumee River above Toledo, Ohio. Learn more about the players in this historical drama by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access primary sources related to Fort … [Read more...]

Today in History: The Birth of a Nation

Today in History–February 8–the Library of Congress features the controversial silent film, The Birth of a Nation, which premiered on this day in 1915. Although the film advanced the art of cinema, it did so by telling a story with a skewed, racist vision of U.S. history. Protested by many, the film was ultimately a great commercial success. Find out more by visiting the Today in History section and then clicking the links below. The Birth of a Nation poster Perfect song; Love strain from … [Read more...]

Today in History: Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell

Today in History–January 23–the Library of Congress features career pioneer Elizabeth Blackwell, who graduated from medical school on this date in 1849. She was the first woman to earn a medical degree in the United States. Learn more about this trailblazing woman by visiting the Today in History section (scroll down) and clicking through to the links listed below. Group portrait of members of the Blackwell family outside on a lawn between 1880 and 1893 Letter, Elizabeth Blackwell to … [Read more...]