June 29, 2017

Primary Source Learning: Slavery (U.S.)

Collection Connections: Arts & Humanities, Critical Thinking & U.S. History teaching ideas Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1938 From Slavery to Freedom: The African-American Pamphlet Collection, 1822-1909 Slaves and the Courts, 1740-1860 Slavery in the United States: Primary Sources and the Historical Record Learning from the Source: Close Reading in Service of a Cause Primary Source Learning: Civil War & Reconstruction … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Slavery (U.S.)

Library slavery collections Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1938 more than 2,300 first-person accounts of slavery and 500 black-and-white photographs of former slaves Caroline Hammond (a fugitive) "I was born in Anne Arundel County near Davidsonville about 3 miles from South River in the year 1844...." The story of Charles Crawley, ex-slave "God knows, how old I am. All I know is, I wuz born 'fore de war...." Voices from the Days of … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Fugitive Slave Law

Practical illustration of the Fugitive Slave Law Effects of the Fugitive-Slave-Law Triumph Fugitive slave law political cartoons Fugitive slave bill ... Approved, September 18, 1850. Millard Fillmore Things to be remembered. Remember that the Whig administration of Millard Fillmore enacted the Fugitive Slave bill, in violation of the constitution and all the legal safeguards of personal liberty Fugitive Slave Law, Senate Congressional Globe documents Fugitive Slave Law, … [Read more...]

Today in History: John Peter Zenger Trial

Today in History–November 27–the Library of Congress features the trial of newspaper man, John Peter Zenger. The trial judge, James Delancey, was born on this day in 1703. In the 1730s Zenger published articles in the New York Weekly Journal exposing the political machinations of Governor William Cosby who, in turn, charged Zenger with seditious libel. Zenger's lawyer, Andrew Hamilton, successfully argued to the jury in 1735 that because the articles contained verifiable facts, they could not be … [Read more...]