August 17, 2017

Primary Source Spotlight: Samuel Morse

Samuel Morse timeline Samuel Morse: Artist, Politician, Photographer Samuel Morse: Invention of the Telegraph Samuel F.B. Morse Sent the First Telegraphic Message from America’s Library What Hath God Wrought? curator video about first telegram Samuel Morse image set Samuel Morse historic newspaper coverage Samuel F. B. Morse Papers at the Library of Congress, 1793 to 1919 (see collection highlights below) Art & Travel Childhood & Family Life … [Read more...]

Today in History: James McNeill Whistler

Today in History–July 10–TPS-Barat features  James McNeill Whistler, born on this date in 1834. This American artist spent time in St. Petersburg, Russia during his childhood and later in England and France, where he studied. Learn more about Whistler through these primary and secondary sources. James McNeill Whistler images & art Whistler’s Butterfly Picture This blog June 20, 2013 Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell Collection of Whistleriana Freer and Sackler … [Read more...]

Today in History: John Trumbull

Today in History–June 6–the Library of Congress features artist John Trumbull, born on this day in 1756 in Lebanon, Connecticut. Before he began painting, this son of Connecticut governor Jonathan Trumbull, served as an aide to General George Washington during the Revolution. Trumbull painted portraits of leading figures of the day and is best known for his historical paintings that adorn the rotunda of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., including the Declaration of … [Read more...]

Today in History: Thomas Moran

Today in History–February 12–the Library of Congress features painter Thomas Moran, born on this date in 1837. In 1871 Moran joined a scientific exploration of lands along the Yellowstone River headed by Ferdinand V. Hayden. Moran's paintings, together with photographer William Henry Jackson's photographs, helped spur public interest in the area and convince Congress to set aside the Yellowstone area as a national park in 1872. Learn more by visiting the Today in History section and by clicking … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Mourning Lincoln & the Art of Tribute

From the Library of Congress bicentennial exhibition—With Malice Toward None—we learn a bit about the profound effect Abraham Lincoln's death had on people all over the world. The assassination of President Abraham Lincoln on Good Friday, April 14, 1865, had a tremendous impact both in the United States and abroad. People in Great Britain, which had favored the South, mourned as if Lincoln had been their leader. France, whose citizens had made no secret of their sympathy for the Union, paid … [Read more...]

Today in History: John James Audubon

Today in History–January 27–the Library of Congress features John James Audubon, who died on this date in 1851. Audubon was a naturalist and artist, earning fame for his drawings and paintings of North American birds. Learn more about the namesake of the National Audubon Society by visiting the Today in History section then click the links below to access more related primary sources. John James Audubon primary source set Select Audubon Birds of America drawings More Audubon … [Read more...]

Primary Source Learning: Teaching with Primary Source Posters

The Teaching with the Library of Congress blog gives some great tips on using the WPA Poster collection with students. One idea is to have students identify persuasion techniques. For a great resource on typical advertising persuasion techniques, check out  Print Advertising Across the Centuries project. One teacher used this project as a template and created a lesson that looked at U.S. military recruitment posters. Intrigued? Be sure to check out all of the Library's poster and graphic arts … [Read more...]