November 23, 2017

Timely Connections: Fake News & Civic Reasoning

Practicing primary source analysis helps students develop historical thinking skills that also happen to be very important civic literacy skills. In an article from the Fall 2017 issue of American Educator, Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) provides assessments of online civic reasoning and tips for going beyond identifying news as "fake" or "real" to understanding where information comes from and who is behind it. Social studies consultant and History Tech blogger Glenn Wiebe provides … [Read more...]

Literature Links: Her Right Foot

Tom Bober (@CaptainLibrary), teacher librarian extraordinaire and former teacher in residence at the Library of Congress, put together a fantastic primary source set to accompany the picture book, Her Right Foot, by Dave Eggers. In a post on Knowledge Quest from the American Association of School Librarians, Tom details a plan for pairing primary source analysis with the book to help students explore how and why the the Statue of Liberty was built and to deepen their understanding of this … [Read more...]

Integrating Tech: Zoom-in to Primary Source Analysis

This is a guest post from Patti Winch, the Middle School Social Studies Specialist for Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS) in Virginia. I first learned about Zoom-ins about 10 years ago when taking a class with Northern Virginia’s Teaching with Primary Sources program or TPSNVA.  Zoom-ins were originally developed by a FCPS teacher and subsequently shared via the TPSNVA platform.  The strategy is also highlighted in Making Thinking Visible by Ron Ritchart, Mark Church, and Karin Morrison … [Read more...]

Analyzing Primary Sources: Identifying Bias in Presidential Election Newspaper Coverage

In a past Teaching with the Library of Congress blog post, Deborah Thomas, program manager for the National Digital Newspaper Program at the Library of Congress, discusses how to help students identify bias and attitude in newspaper articles related to the 1912 presidential election. National Council for Social Studies (NCSS) members can access Thomas's original article, which identifies four newspaper items she selected, from the November/December, 2015 issue of Social Education, the journal of … [Read more...]

Tech Tool: Creating a Google Form for Primary Source Analysis

This is a guest post from Kelly Grotrian, an American History teacher at East Brunswick High School in East Brunswick, New Jersey. Google Forms is a great tool to use for student primary source analysis because it provides a single point of access for multiple sources and efficiently collates student responses into a spreadsheet which you can use to evaluate work and inform your instruction. Here is how to start using Google Forms (new version) with a primary source analysis … [Read more...]

Integrating Tech: Primary Source Analysis using Google Forms

This is a guest post from Kelly Grotrian, an American History teacher at East Brunswick High School in East Brunswick, New Jersey. Far and away my favorite Google App for Education is Google Forms. Forms allows you to present a variety of primary sources to students in an organized fashion and to collect data on the analysis of those sources to inform your instruction. Google Forms also allow learners to work at their own pace, which is something that my students enjoy because they have the … [Read more...]

Primary Source Learning: History Assessments of Thinking

Is the painting above by J.L.G Ferris—The First Thanksgiving 1621—a useful resource for historians who wish to understand the relationship between the Wampanoag Indians and the Pilgrim settlers in 1621? This is the question asked by Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) consortium member Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) in one of their Beyond the Bubble History Assessments of Thinking (HATs). Beyond the Bubble uses Library of Congress primary sources in "easy-to-use … [Read more...]

Tech Tool: Primary Source Analysis & Annotation with ThingLink

ThingLink is an online tool that allows you to layer images and videos with text, web links, and other media files. Most digitized primary sources from the Library of Congress, including most text documents, are saved as image files so ThingLink is a great tool for analyzing and annotating primary sources directly on the sources themselves. ThingLink is really easy to use. Check it out yourself by watching this YouTube video tutorial created by Dierdre Shetler for Cartwright School District … [Read more...]

Analyzing Primary Sources: Elementary Image & Text Analysis Sheets

Primary sources engage all students—elementary, middle and high school. Below are some worksheets to help elementary students, in particular, to analyze primary source images and texts. These worksheets were created by TPS-Barat and master teacher Kimberly Heckart, who teaches third grade at Prairie Ridge Elementary in Cedar Rapids, Iowa and Elementary Social Studies Methods at the University of Iowa. Kim whose accolades include Elementary Social Studies Teacher of the Year for both the Iowa and … [Read more...]

Teaching Now: Analyzing Primary Sources for Scientific Thinking & Organization

This is a guest post from Tom Bober (a.k.a. @CaptainLibrary), an elementary librarian at RM Captain Elementary in Clayton, Missouri and frequent contributor to the TPS Teachers Network. Earlier this school year I wrote about an activity in which third grade students analyzed primary sources from the Library of Congress, specifically the notes, diagrams, and writings of scientists to explore how scientists organize information. The hope was that students would connect these organizational … [Read more...]