April 27, 2017

Learning from the Source: Cesar Chavez & Good Citizenship

This activity is adapted from lessons in the Barat Education Foundation Our American Voice® program. This civics program for 4-8 graders features a spiral curriculum and emphasizes critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills as students learn the fundamentals of American democracy and work to create positive change in their communities. Overview Using Cesar Chavez as an example, students consider how good citizens contribute to their communities and work together to affect … [Read more...]

Featured Image: A Few of the Things for Which We Are Thankful, Also Unthankful

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Featured Source: Kenya 12-69

Imagine you are from another planet and have been charged with reporting back to your commander on this country called Kenya on the continent of Africa. Zoom into this composite map and investigate the information presented. Create an outline of your findings. Compare the information in this composite map with one of the maps linked to below, noting similarities and differences. Kenya population density, NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center 2000 Kenya's ethnic groups, BBC … [Read more...]

Finding Resources: Everyday Mysteries

If you're looking for some fun science facts to intrigue and delight your elementary students, head over to the Everyday Mysteries section of LOC.gov. This part of the Library of Congress website gives answers to many of life's most interesting scientific questions, all of which were asked by researchers and answered by librarians from the Library's Science Reference Services. You can search for topics on the homepage or browse archived questions and answers by … [Read more...]

Featured Image: The first great Western empire

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Primary Source Spotlight: George Washington Carver & Tuskegee Institute

From America's Library: Born: About 1864 (exact date is unknown) Died: January 5, 1943 George Washington Carver was born a slave in Diamond Grove, Missouri, around 1864. He is one of the nation's most famous agricultural scientists. He is best known for his research on peanuts and his commitment to helping poor Southern African American farmers. Carver worked at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama for most of his adult life. In 1943, soon after Carver's death, President Franklin D. Roosevelt … [Read more...]

Primary Source Spotlight: Life on the Farm

What was life on the farm like before large agribusness operations began to dominate U.S. agricultural production? To get a glimpse into the past, take a look at the Today in History section for August 29 (you'll need to scroll down to access the second topic), then click the links below to access a cornucopia of primary source treasures. Farming image set More farming images from American Memory Dairy farm image set More dairy farm images from American Memory Farming oral … [Read more...]

Today in History: George Perkins Marsh

Today in History–September 30–the Library of Congress features Congressman George Perkins Marsh, who delivered a speech on agricultural conditions in New England on this day in 1847 that recognized the capacity for environmental destruction and advocated for resource management and restoration. Find out more by reviewing the Today in History section and reviewing the resources below. Man and nature; or, Physical geography as modified by human action by George P. Marsh 1864 Historical … [Read more...]

Learning from the Source: Media & Migrant Laborer Perspectives

Voices from the Dust Bowl: The Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin Migrant Worker Collection is an online presentation of a multi-format ethnographic field collection documenting the everyday life of residents of Farm Security Administration (FSA) migrant work camps in central California in 1940 and 1941. Todd and Sonkin, both of the City College of New York, traveled to Arvin, Bakersfield, El Rio, Firebaugh, Porterville, Shafter, Thornton, Visalia, Westley, and Yuba City, California and recorded … [Read more...]