April 25, 2017

Primary Source Spotlight: Civil Rights

Teaching resources NAACP primary source set with teacher guide Baseball, Race Relations and Jackie Robinson Baseball, Race and Ethnicity: Rounding the Bases Learning from the Source: I Have a Dream Image Sequencing Civil Rights Act of 1964 educator webinar recording The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom Idea Book for Educators Teaching with the Library of Congress civil rights blog posts The Civil Rights History Project: Primary Sources and Oral … [Read more...]

Presidential Spotlight: Dwight D. Eisenhower

From America’s Library: Dwight D. Eisenhower Born: October 14, 1890 Died: March 28, 1969 Dwight David Eisenhower was an inspiring military leader, best-selling author, head of Columbia University, and president of the United States. As the top American general and later Allied Supreme Commander in the European theater, he directed Allied forces in World War II to victories in North Africa and Italy and coordinated the massive and successful D-Day invasion of France. Extraordinarily … [Read more...]

Today in History: Frank Sinatra

Today in History–July 13–the Library of Congress features Frank Sinatra, who made his recording debut on this day in 1939 with the Harry James band. After, Sinatra sang with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra before beginning his solo career. On his own, Sinatra became a teenage sensation but would later appeal to music and movie fans of multiple generations. Learn more about this talented artist by visiting the Today in History section, then click the links below to access more primary … [Read more...]

Today in History: Billie Holiday

Today in History–April 7–the Library of Congress features jazz singer Billie Holiday, born on this date in 1915 in Baltimore, Maryland. Although she had no formal music training, Holiday arranged and composed music in addition to singing. Her 1939 rendition of Lewis Allan's "Strange Fruit," a song about lynching, was described in the liner notes to Immortal Sessions of Billie Holiday as "…the most anguished and harrowing expression of protest against man's inhumanity to man that has ever been … [Read more...]

Today in History: Marian Anderson

Today in History–January 7–the Library of Congress features singer Marian Anderson, who made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City on his day in 1955. Barred from attending a Philadelphia music school because of her race, Anderson's family, friends and church helped fund private voice lessons. Although she toured Europe and the United States extensively, Anderson continued to suffer discrimination. In the most infamous incident, in 1939 Anderson was prohibited from performing … [Read more...]

Today in History: Guggenheim Museum

Today in History–October 21–the Library of Congress features the Guggenheim Museum, opened on this day in 1959. This contemporary art museum designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright was the brainchild of Solomon Guggenheim as a way to promote art and art education. Find out more by visiting  the Today in History section, then click the links below to uncover related resources. Guggenheim Museum image set Solomon Guggenheim image set Frank Lloyd Wright primary source … [Read more...]

Primary Source Learning: Postwar United States (1945-1968) Primary Source Set

Have students use the primary sources in this set to tell a story about the period 1945-1968. The wartime economy led to new economic prosperity for the United States and expanded opportunities for many, but certainly not all its citizens. As a result, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and American women took up the fight for civil rights and equality. This was also the era that spawned the Cold War. The story about era featuring the best of times and worst of times may be in digital or … [Read more...]

Today in History: Television

Today in History–August 19–the Library of Congress features children's television. On this date in 1950, ABC aired its first Saturday morning children's television shows: Animal Clinic and the variety show Acrobat Ranch, which featured two young acrobats, Tumbling Tim and Flying Flo, and children competing in games and stunts. Learn more about children's television as well as the history of television by visiting the Today in History section and clicking the links below. Television image … [Read more...]

Today in History: Alexander Calder

Today in History–July 22–the Library of Congress features artist Alexander Calder, born on this date in 1898 in Pennsylvania. Calder's mother was a painter and his father was a sculptor but Alexander began his career as a mechanical engineer. That early career choice served him well as an artist later when creating his first motor-driven sculptures, later dubbed "mobiles". Learn more by visiting the Today in History section, then clicking the links below. Alexander Calder born from America's … [Read more...]

Today in History: The Marshall Plan

Today in History–June 19–the Library of Congress features the Marshall Plan. On this day in 1947, British and French foreign ministers invited 22 European nations to participate in designing a plan for rebuilding war-torn Europe. Two weeks earlier in a speech at Harvard University, World War II general and U.S. Secretary of State George C. Marshall had called for a multi-billion dollar European aid package designed to stabilize the world economy and discourage the spread of communism. Nearly … [Read more...]