March 28, 2017

Primary Source Spotlight: Fugitive Slave Law

Practical illustration of the Fugitive Slave Law
Practical illustration of the Fugitive Slave Law

Effects of the Fugitive-Slave-Law

Triumph

Fugitive slave law political cartoons

Fugitive slave bill … Approved, September 18, 1850. Millard Fillmore

Things to be remembered. Remember that the Whig administration of Millard Fillmore enacted the Fugitive Slave bill, in violation of the constitution and all the legal safeguards of personal liberty

Fugitive Slave Law, Senate Congressional Globe documents

Fugitive Slave Law, House of Representatives Congressional Globe documents

Fugitive Slave Law transcript from The Avalon Project, Yale Law School

Argument of H.S. Fitch, Esq. … on the trial of John Hossack, indicted for rescuing a fugitive slave from the United States deputy marshal, at Ottawa, Ill., Oct. 20, 1859; delivered in the U. S. District Court in the Northern District of Illinois, March 4, 1860

Objections to the Act of 1850 Reviewed” from Documentary history of slavery in the United States: By a native of Maryland 1851

More books & other texts related to the Fugitive Slave Law 1837-1895

Fugitive slave law: U.S. historic newspaper coverage, 1850

Fugitive slave law: Illinois historic newspaper coverage, 1836-1866

Slaves and the Courts, 1740-1860 American Memory collection

Collection Connections: teaching ideas (in particular, see “State’s Rights and the Fugitive Slave Law”)

Featured Source: Synopsis of the Fugitive Slave Law guided primary source analysis activities

Primary Source Spotlight: Slavery (U.S.)

Primary Source Learning: Slavery (U.S.)

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